Can I get rid of wrinkles caused my smoking cosmetically?

Doctor Answers 6

Can "smoker's lines" be removed?

At our practice we would definitely suggest you quit smoking before beginning any treatment plan.  That being said we would customize a treatment plan for you that fits in to your lifestyle and fulfills your goals.

Once that is accomplished, we have so many great options non-surgically for the reduction in lines around the mouth due to smoking and otherwise.  The peri-oral area is a common area of concern for patients and can be treated specifically with CO2RE laser (fractionated CO2), Sublative Fractional RF (fraxel and radio frequency), chemical peels such as the VI Peel and microneedling.

I would recommend a personalized consultation for the best treatment plan for your skin.

Hope this helps.  Good luck.


New York Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 72 reviews

Smoking, Wrinkles and Cosmetic Solutions

Dear brandonmarsh17:

Yes, there are many non-surgical cosmetic treatment modalities that can help you soften up some of your wrinkles caused by smoking.  These include Botox, dermal fillers, chemical peels and lasers.  Smoking cessation is an absolute necessity and priority if you would like to reap the best results.  Wishing you much success.

Smoker's Wrinkles

Smoker's wrinkles are just like the wrinkles that everyone get, except that they occur much earlier depending how much you smoke. The first step in correcting them is stopping smoking. If you continue smoking the creation of the winkles is usually faster than we can correct them. After that, what you will need depends on the wrinkles and where they are. Treatment will usually begin with a skin rejuvenation regimen to stimulate collagen and also correct the other skin problems that accompany the wrinkles like color abnormalities. For this, I prefer the Obagi Nu-Derm System. If you are willing to wait for results, this may be all you need. After stabilizing the skin and, especially, the pigment cells. For faster correction, a leveling peel or laser is then used with significant reduction in problems and complications due to the skin prep. Make sure you see a physician who specializes in skin rejuvenation.

Robert T. Buchanan, MD
Highlands Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

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Wrinkles and smoking

You can likely improve them. Definitely stopping smoking is the most important factor. Collagen production in smokers is blunted, such that treatments such as lasers and microneedling - that rely on collagen production - won't work as well until you stop smoking. If you are planning on stopping, wait at least 1-2 months before you're treated to get the best results. This will give your skin time recover collagen producing capability prior to treatment. 

I wish you the best in your efforts if you decide to stop smoking. It's challenging, but worth it for your health. 


Take care,

Dr. Norcom


Derek Norcom, MD
Portland Physician
4.9 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

Smoker Wrinkle Solutions with lasers, microneedling/prp, radiofrequency and fillers

There are many options for wrinkles from smoking and that includes fillers, lasers, peels, and radiofrequency.  I suggest seeing a cosmetic dermatologist with extensive experience in using lasers and fillers for a formal evaluation. Best, Dr. Emer.

Jason Emer, MD
Los Angeles Dermatologic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 167 reviews

Smoking is terrible for skin

I have written a blog about smoking. Please see the link. Anything that stimulates collagen won't work in your case. Good skin care and chemical peels will help the appearance of the skin but stopping your smoking will be the best thing you can do for your skin. Lasers will be less effective (but still yield some results) in a smoker as well.

Steven F. Weiner, MD
Panama City Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.6 out of 5 stars 27 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.