Acne scar treatment - laser surgery?

I've acne scars on my face. I'd like to know if they can be removed by laser surgery.

Doctor Answers 8

Always target the acne scar type for best results.

Acne scar revision is a specialised field. For the best results, one should target the acne scar type with ideal treatments. For example deep ice pick scars, and narrow box car scars can be treated with TCA CROSS peels, mixed scars, rolling, and atrophic scars treated with fractional devices such as Fraxel, fractional lasers, PRP and INFINI radiofrequency. Atrophic scars (depressions) can be treated with either fat grafts, or with HA dermal fillers. Tethered and anchored scars are best treated with surgery.

The majority of patients will have a collection of different scar types, and hence a tailored treatment METHOD will be best. Careful examination, especially under angled lighting with scar mapping will give you an understanding of what are the best options for your scars.

All the best,

Dr Davin Lim.

Laser, surgical & aesthetic dermatologist.

Brisbane, Australia.


Brisbane Dermatologist
4.7 out of 5 stars 62 reviews

Acne scar treatment - laser surgery?

For Acne scarring you have a couple of options. The Fraxel Laser is good for acne scars but also is the Skin Pen or Micro Needling Treatments. Depending on the result you want to achieve and the amount of downtime you have will determine the better procedure for you. The Micr Needling can be done on any skin type with little to no downtime. You will probably need 6 treatments that can be done a month apart. I would look into this for your skin.

Bruce K. Smith, MD
Houston Plastic Surgeon
4.4 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Acne Scar Treatments

There are different types of acne scars which call for individual assessment and a customized approach for each person. Treatments options include: use of peels (we have had good success with VI Peel and Perfect Peel); microdermabrasion; micro-needling; laser treatment (with fractional CO2 or Fraxel); subcision; or injection of dermal fillers. We use Bellafill for long-term correction of distensible rolling scars. It's best to see an expert who can evaluate your scars and discuss the relevant options with you.

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Acne scar treatment - laser surgery?

YOU have provided a great question. They real questions weather these scars you have are new or are old is important. If new, then you can have technology to prevent long term scarring. If the scars are old, you can have treatments which could include laser therapy to improve their appearance. Providing your pictures could help with responses. 

Michael Kulick, MD, DDS
San Francisco Plastic Surgeon
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Treatment of Acne Scarring

The optimal treatment program would be dependent on the nature and extent of the scarring. A synergistic approach is always best as the treatment of severe acne scarring can be quite challenging. If the scars are more superficial you can benefit from a topical exfoliation treatment such as a Silk Peel Dermalinfusion or chemical peel. However, these treatment options alone are generally inadequate to achieve a significant improvement.  Therefore, at Skin MD, we almost always combine Silk Peels with a fractional resurfacing laser treatment for an enhanced outcome. A consultation with an experienced provider is always recommended to determine the appropriate treatment regime and expected outcome.  Kind Regards, Dr. Paul Flashner

Paul Flashner, MD
Peabody Physician
5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review

Acne Scar Solutions with lasers, fillers, subcision and microneedling/prp

A combination approach is needed. You can get improvement with lasers, fillers, subcision, and microneedling/prp. See an expert in acne scarring for a formal evaluation.  Best, Dr. Emer.

Jason Emer, MD
Los Angeles Dermatologic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 167 reviews

For Acne Scars, Forget The Knee-Jerk Hype For Lasers & Concentrate On The Individual Scars Present

Photos would have been helpful. However, in their absence I can make a few general comments. Acne scars do not typically come in just one variety. Most people suffering from them have the whole gamut of scars present on their faces, including rolling scars, superficial and deep boxcar scars, and pit scars. Occasionally, especially in people of color, raised hypertrophic or keloid scars, may also be present. While unfortunately, there is currently no way to completely eliminate scars of any kind, including those from acne, we do have legitimate ways of improving their appearance. For example, for depressed scars (atrophic, indented) scars, Subcision Lifting with or without the accompanying use of a filler may be used. Pit scars may do well with TCA Cross Technique. Hypertrophic and keloid scars may profit from injections of antiinflammatory agents. Owing in large measure to a whole lot of marketing hype backed by laser device manufacturers (although not truly supported by a whole lot of hard science), lasers pop immediately to the public's mind as the "one size fits all" way to treat just about every skin problem, including acne scars. Importantly, despite in my experience their disappointing efficacy, they pose a potential serious risk of causing pigmentary abnormalities, including permanent loss of pigmentation, particularly in people of color. Better to address the individual problems. Make sure you seek out a board certified aesthetic physician with experience and expertise in treating all forms of acne scars. Best of luck to you.

Nelson Lee Novick, MD
New York Dermatologic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

Acne scars and lasers

I would never say we can remove acne scars. We can only improve them. Laser resurfacing is one choice. I now prefer using the Infini for acne scars. If the scars are red, Excel V laser is useful.

Steven F. Weiner, MD
Panama City Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.6 out of 5 stars 27 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.