I'm a 125 lbs 22 year old Female and have moderate Pectus Carinatum, is a brace an option for me?

My right rib cage always stuck out more (but not visible enough to tell) than the left one. My right breast is a lot bigger and droops with the nipple outward, the left one is normal. When I look down my chest, instead of having an even valley between my chest, its more of a slope. So my chest always looks like its tilted towards the Left. Is a chest brace still an option for me? I don't want to go through surgery.

Doctor Answers 2

Pectus Carinatum

Breast augmentation surgery may be a great way to help camouflage chest wall concerns/asymmetry.  In other words, with a well executed procedure (carefully positioned  breast implant "pocket" and careful selection of breast implant size/profile), the area of "protruding bone" will likely be covered nicely (you will find a representative case on a recent review posted to our profile: "pectus carinatum coverup").  


Generally speaking, the best online advice I can give to ladies who are considering breast augmentation surgery ( regarding breast implant size/profile selection) is:



1. Concentrate on choosing your plastic surgeon carefully. Concentrate on appropriate training, certification, and the ability of the plastic surgeon to achieve the results you are looking for. ***Ask to see lots of examples of his/her work.



2. Have a full discussion and communication regarding your desired goals with your plastic surgeon. This communication will be critical in determining breast implant size/type/profile will most likely help achieve your goals. 

In my practice, the use of photographs of “goal” pictures (and breasts that are too big or too small) is very helpful. For example, I have found that the use of words such as “natural” or "C or D cup" etc means different things to different people and therefore prove unhelpful.

Also, as you know, cup size varies depending on him who makes the bra; therefore, discussing desired cup size may also be inaccurate. Again, the use of computer imaging has been very helpful during the communication process, in our practice.


3. Once you feel you have communicated your goals clearly, allow your plastic surgeon to use his/her years of experience/judgment to choose the breast implant size/profile that will best meet your goals. Again, in my practice, this decision is usually made during surgery, after the use of temporary intraoperative sizers.

I hope this (and the attached link, dedicated to breast augmentation surgery concerns) helps. Best wishes for an outcome that you will be very pleased with. 

 

Pectus Deformity

Dear Ms. Becabear285,

Thank you for your questions.
I understand your feelings.

Unfortunately without photos I can only make general comments and I don't believe that a brace would significantly improve your chest appearance.

I realize your desire not to have surgery, however it may be the only option if you want correction/improvement.

As long as you are not having any physical symptoms you can:
1)  a custom made firm silicone implant to equal out the "valley" (cleavage) area
2) breast equalization (reduction larger breast, breast augmentation of the smaller breast
or asymmetric sized breast implants if you desired breasts to be  larger.
3) if your breasts "droop" (ptosis) you may require a mastopexy (lifting the breasts, making the nipple/areolar complex (NAC) the same size, and postioning the NAC's in a symmetrical location on the breast.


I recommend that you make several consultative appointments with Plastic Surgeons who are experienced and Certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery. In addition ideally they are members of the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery (denoting by membership as having met additional criteria and a focus on Cosmetic Plastic Surgery).

I wish you my best and success,




R. A. Hardesty, MD, FACS
Diplomate and Certified by the Am. Bd. of Plastic Surgery
wwwimagineplasticsurgery.com
4646 Brockton Ave
Riverside, Ca 92506
(951) 686-7600

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.