Is there anything that can be done about these wrinkles under my eyes, either home care or an in office procedure? (photos)

They only really show when I'm smiling, but I am starting to be very self conscious of them. I have been using Retin A for almost two years, and I use sunblock daily.

Doctor Answers 3

Under eye wrinkle correction

Thank you for your question. I have had amazing results with a combination of Xeomin or Botox to help relax the muscles on the bridge of your nose and Belotero to soften the fine lines. If you look in a mirror and raise up your nose to make the " bunny lines" this will wrinkle under the eyes most of the time. A little neurotoxin (Botox or Xeomin) around the eye and in the bridge of nose muscles can help reduce the wrinkling. With Belotero a filler under the eyes leads to a lovely effect. I use this particular filler almost exclusively for this effect of softening the wrinkles without overfilling the tear trough area. Also the best eye cream I have seen (and I have used it myself for 5 years faithfully) is Lumiere from Neocutis.

Under Eye Wrinkles

Hi and thank you for your question! Along with the topical products, I would suggest starting some laser or energy based treatments to stimulate collagen. We would choose which treatment to do depending on how much downtime you can or want to have and your skin type. If you would like the most dramatic effect in one treatment, we would recommend the Sciton Contour. This would have anywhere from 1-2 weeks downtime. If you would like less downtime, we might suggest the Venus Viva, this would have 2-4 days downtime and we would recommend 3 treatments of this. We find both of these procedures to improve the texture and elasticity of that thinning skin in the eye area. Best, Dr. Grant Stevens

Grant Stevens, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 137 reviews

Under eye wrinkles

Thanks for your question. Retin A (tretinoin) is often thought of and the major anti-aging topical but in fact it is primarily an exfoliation enhancer. When you are looking to build collagen and elastin, to treat fine lines, you would do better to use a medical grade retinol (this is the vitamin A that goes intracellular, versus retin A which is the form that stays primarily extracellular)- by medical grade I mean microencapsulated -such as eye treatments made by ZO medical :ZO® MEDICAL

$140
Hydrafirm™ Eye Brightening Repair CrèmeNet Wt. 15 g / 0.5 Oz.

Specially designed for the delicate eye area.
Helps minimize the multiple signs of aging, including puffiness, dark
circles and fine lines.

  • Retinol and hydrolyzed sericin: Collagen stimulation helps diminish the appearance of fine lines
  • Kojic dipalmitate: Targets pigment production to help lighten dark circles
  • Saccharomyces lysate extract, carnitine, coenzyme A, caffeine: Promotes microcirculation to reduce puffiness
  • Shea Butter and squalane: Skin lipid, barrier replenishment

  • Sodium PCA and olive fruit extract: Hydrator and moisture replenishers
  • Arnica Montana flower extract: Antioxidant and anti-irritant

along with another collagen and elastin stimulator such as Alastin or Regenica topicals. Many "over the counter" products claim to contain retinol but in fact have only a fraction of a percent (like 0.08%) of retinol which is NOT enough to have a clinically significant effect. For procedures, we have had excellent results with Ultherapy smoothing treatments- usually 3 sessions about a month apart- excellent collagen response with really zero downtime. Also, I use very small doses of botulinum toxin, 2 to 4 units per side, to relax the tiny muscles  in the region as well- this gives a nice "immediate gratification" smoothing while you are waiting for the more gradual result from other procedures to show. Botulinum toxin in the under eye region should only be performed by someone who is very experienced in treating this area.Best,Lisa Vuich, MD

Lisa Vuich, MD
Nashua Physician
4.7 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

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