Long Term Use of Triamcinolone for Dermatitis Safe?

I have dealt with seborhic dermatitis for about twenty years. I am so sick and tired of it. I use Nizoral shampoo and ZNP soap as well as Triamcinolone cream. It is the worse on my face, around my nose and cheeks at times. I am concerned about the long term use of the Triamcinolone because I believe it is a cortocosteroid, but it seems to be one of the only things that works. Is it safe for long term use? If not, what can I do? Please help. Thank you.

Doctor Answers 1

Triamcinolone for dermatitis.

Long-term use of any topical corticosteroid can cause steroid-associated acne-rosacea, thinning of the skin, stretch marks. Furthermore, with continuous use, any single corticosteroid tends to decrease in effectiveness over time. To get flares of seborrheic dermatitis under control, I recommend application of a topical corticosteroid twice daily for no longer than 2 weeks, continuously. If someone needs it more long-term, I recommend alternating 3 days on, 3 days off. Non-corticosteroid creams such as Elidel and Protopic may be worth looking into if you have not yet tried them.

Good luck.


San Diego Dermatologist
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Triamcinolone for dermatitis.

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Long-term use of any topical corticosteroid can cause steroid-associated acne-rosacea, thinning of the skin, stretch marks. Furthermore, with continuous use, any single corticosteroid tends to decrease in effectiveness over time. To get flares of seborrheic dermatitis under control, I recommend application of a topical corticosteroid twice daily for no longer than 2 weeks, continuously. If someone needs it more long-term, I recommend alternating 3 days on, 3 days off. Non-corticosteroid creams such as Elidel and Protopic may be worth looking into if you have not yet tried them.

Good luck.


San Diego Dermatologist

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