Can I walk my dog the day after breast augmentation??

Doctor Answers 12

Walking your dog after breast augmentation

This really depends on the size/weight of your dog. If you have a 5 pound chihuahua you will be able to start walking him sooner than you can resume walking a 70 pound lab! But with that said, you should wait at least 3 - 4 weeks to walk your dog again to avoid any possible risks. Please speak with your surgeon about this in person so you can tell him how big your dog is and get a more personalized recommendation for how long you should wait to walk your dog after surgery. Good luck!


Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
4.7 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

Walking the dog after breast augmentation

After a breast augmentation, you should avoid any strenuous activity for at least 3-4 weeks until you can return to normal activities. I recommend having a friend or family walk your dog. However, this maybe different depending on the size of your dog and their temperament 

Miguel Delgado, MD
San Francisco Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 68 reviews

Breast augmentation and activities

It is probably not a good idea to walk a dog that can potentially pull you right after surgery.  It is best to avoid exertion right after surgery.

Steven Wallach, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.1 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Activity following breast augmentation

Thank you for your question!I advise my patients to not push, pull, or lift anything over 5 pounds. This being said, you have to think of all of your daily day to day activities, some that seem very routine but could possibly pose a problem if something out of the ordinary happens. I'd say it depends on the size of your dog too!  If you have a pit bull, and it gets spooked and yanks on the leash- that would be very painful. Of course, if your dog is a tiny teacup poodle, it wouldn't be that big of an issue. Be sure to follow your plastic surgeon's post operative instructions carefully and your recovery should be successful.  Best of luck to you.

Fred Hackney, MD
Dallas Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 20 reviews

ADL's after BAM

Hi conwak
I always like to think of the worst thing that could go wrong in a given situation.
I see the dog getting spooked, or taking off with you in tow.  I see you getting seriously injured.  Remember you will be stiff, sore, and on drugs, so you are vulnerable.
My advice would be to avoid this until cleared by doctor.  

Post Op Dog Walking

Thank you for your question, and I recommend against it in the immediate post op period.  It is best to discuss with your Board Certified Plastic Surgeon his/her specific recommendations as far as return to activity. The recovery after BA surgery varies widely from patient to patient as well as their level of discomfort during this time. Generally, the first 4-7 days are reserved for rest and overall recovery, and after that patients can slowly work their way back with gradual low risk activities. I prefer to wait at least 6-8 weeks for repetitive upper body lifting/movements and arm use so that the muscles, skin incisions and breast tissues have had adequate time to heal and settle before being stressed. The recovery routine will best be determined by your Board Certified Plastic Surgeon so be sure to touch base with him/her on their specific recommendations.
Best of luck,Benjamin J. Cousins MDBoard Certified Plastic SurgeonMiami Beach, Florida



Benjamin J. Cousins, MD
Miami Beach Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Can I walk my dog the day after breast augmentation??

Thank you for your question.  Because of the pulling that a dog could place on your arms I would avoid walking them for at least a few days after surgery.  This will minimize the risk of pain and bleeding. Hope this helps.

Nelson Castillo, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 43 reviews

Walking the dog 1 day post-op

You SHOULD NOT walk your dog 1 day after your surgery.
Recovery should not be rushed nor underestimated. You must diligently follow your surgeon’s instructions and take good care of yourself to ensure your body has sufficient time to heal and look its best.
Normally, it is recommended not to do heavy lifting of greater than 10 lbs for the first 3 weeks. After 2-3 weeks, you should be able to begin your light exercise routine, such as brisk walking, cycling, aerobics and lower-body weight training. So you should increase your activity level gradually such that you are not putting strain on your body, and especially your breasts. Increasing the activity level is dependent on your own perception of how well you feel. Any minute you feel an activity is causing pressure or causing you to feel a stretch in your breasts, then stop the activity. Point to note is that you want to avoid using your chest muscles.
With regards to walking your dog, I am assuming it is small and if so then it would be okay to walk it after 2 weeks. But if you have an excited dog, then any aggressive tug by your dog may compromise healing of the breasts. Hence, try to avoid walking the dog as long as you can. After 6 weeks, you can walk your dog worry-free.
If there is no one to walk the dog, and if the dog is trained to walk off-leash or if the dog does not have a habit to pull on the leash, then it may be okay as long as you are able to walk. Again, I highly discourage it.
Please call and discuss this with your plastic surgeon. Their instructions should take precedence as they are better informed about your surgical details. Hope this helps

Martin Jugenburg, MD
Toronto Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 427 reviews

Post op Activity Restrictions

Hello,
I recommend that my patients limit use of their arms for a few days post op, then avoid lifting more than 10 pounds for 6 weeks post op. Typically, this would include not walking a larger dog which may pull. I recommend that you speak with your Plastic Surgeon about your post op activity restrictions.
All the best

Can I walk my dog the day after breast augmentation??

I think you will be best off NOT walking your dog (even a small one) for a few days after the porcedure is performed.  Best wishes.

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.