FUE hair transplant donor area scars. Is there any laser surgery/products to heal this or will it heal in time? (photo)

I had a fue hair transplant 1 year ago and the back of my head still looks like this. I want to know id there is anything that can be done about this. Thanks a lot.

Doctor Answers 8

FUE Scarring

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For hiding the scars generally all you can do is grow your hair out longer, get SMP done, or utilize a combination of both. At a year out from your surgery the scars themselves are probably not going to change any further.


Santa Monica Hair Restoration Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 85 reviews

Donor scalp after FUE

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 You have several options to camouflage your donor area.  The easiest if to let your hair grow longer.  The second is micropigmentation.  The 3rd would be to have second hair transplant to smooth out the transition zone and use those grafts to re-enforce the front.

Parsa Mohebi, MD
Beverly Hills Hair Restoration Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 33 reviews

It is unfortunate but FUE is not a "scarless" surgery. You cannot remove the scarring but you can consider

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It is unfortunate but FUE is not a "scarless" surgery.  You cannot remove the scarring but you can consider Scalp MicroPigmentation (SMP).

Jae Pak, MD
Los Angeles Hair Restoration Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 103 reviews

Donor area scarring from FUE

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There really is very little outside of letting your hair grow longer to hide the donor scars.  You may consider SMP to shade the area and trick the eye with the color contrast.

Justin Misko, MD
Lincoln Hair Restoration Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

FUE scars

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hi dear....

please keep in mind there is no such thing as scar less surgery in hair restoration...so nothing can heel these scars once you get it.

you can either go for another hair restoration procedure to fill these scars or even try Scalp Micro pigmentation on your overly harvested donor area.My suggestion is first try scalp micro pigmentation as its not only cost effective but give u better cosmetics results.

Muhammad Jawad, MD
Pakistan Hair Restoration Surgeon

Scars from FUE

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I don't know how many grafts you had done but it appears that the donor area has been overharvested.Perhaps if you let the hair grow several inches those areas will be covered.If not consider Scalp Micropigmentation(SMP)

David Deutsch, MD
Beverly Hills Hair Restoration Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 45 reviews

FUE Scars

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There are  a couple of ways to mask the scarring from FUE. The easy way is to wear your hair a little longer and if the donor area was not over harvested, you may find it acceptable. The other way is micro-pigmentation which if done properly will allow you to wear your hair slightly shorter. You raise a great point for this forum and that is that there is scarring from both FUE and FUT. To obtain best results, individuals with hair loss should seek a full-time expert in both FUE and FUT and work with them to find the best solution for them. The American Board of Hair Restoration Surgeons prohibits marketing of FUE as a scar-less procedure. 

FUE scars

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The only treatment that works on FUE scars is scalp micropigmentation, something we do every day in our office, see below. If it is not done by an expert, the back of your head will look painted

William Rassman, MD
Los Angeles Hair Restoration Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 28 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.