Implants for flat midface/ long vertical chin growth? (photos)

I want to correct the vertical growth issues of my profile and since I don't have sleep apnea or other severe issues the mma surgery seems a bit too risky/excessive. What all would you recommend to help correct my profile (ps I don't mind my pointed nose but I wish I looked more like the photo I included, not sure if that would involve a rhinoplasty or not?).

Doctor Answers 6

Facial fat grafting for facial volumization

Consider trying a facial filler like Voluma or fat grafting to the mid-face - you have a long and narrow face with some nice features. Adding some volume to your cheeks and cheek bone (malar) are will add some facial width and balance your appearance.

Vertical Chin Reduction and Midface Augmentation

Your long chin can only be reduced by an intraoral wedge reduction genioplasty. Your midface augmentation requires an extended heek style implant which adds volume high in the cheeks and back along the zygomatic arch. Your lower midface projection is adequate. A rhinoplasty may be helpful but not as important as the cheek and chin procedures for achieving your improved facial shape. 

Implants for flat midface/ long vertical chin growth?

Tissue reaction occurred against these sutures which were knitted just like the spider web results in collagen production with the help of fibroblasts and growth factors. Collagens surround the sutures and create a natural web structure. The main reasons of the skin sagging is that the loss of elasticity due to deformation of collagen and elastin fibers. In the Spider Web Aesthetics, it is aimed to restore these collagen and elastin fibers with the help of skin tissue itself. Since these fibers are replaced by the body itself with the help of polydioxanone sutures; the results are very natural that no one can understand the patient had an aesthetic procedure.

Cheek implants and a rhinoplasty

Cheek implants are required to augment the midface on a permanent basis. Fillers can be used temporarily to augment the midface. A rhinoplasty is required to shave down the dorsal hump, and decrease the overall projection of the nose. Osteotomies  will be required. For more information and many examples of both rhinoplasty and cheek implants results, please see the link and the video below.

William Portuese, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.7 out of 5 stars 126 reviews

Implants for flat midface/ long vertical chin growth?

Thanks for your question.  I would have you initially try filler injections to the cheek bone area as well as to the angle of your jaw.  If you liked the results you could then consider fat grafting on one or more occasions to build up these regions longer term.  I avoid cheek implants since I have seen a few patients who complained that they exaggerated the natural asymmetry that most people have in the position of their cheek bone prominences.  Get a few opinions from Bd Certified plastic surgeons or facial plastic surgeons and proceed slowly.  Good luck and best wishes.

Jon A Perlman MD FACS 

Certified, American Board of Plastic Surgery 

Extreme Makeover Surgeon ABC TV

Best of Los Angeles Award 2015, 2016 

Beverly Hills, Ca

Jon A. Perlman, MD
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 29 reviews


Thank you for the question and photos. There is a couple of things you can consider to create a profile that you like. The first is cheek augmentation with fillers or with implants. Implants work well and are permanent and will emphasize the midface and frame your eyes. Another option is fat grafting to augment the cheeks and midface. Also, rhinoplasty may be one way to refine the midface, but you have to be careful to avoid making your nose too small or too short because it will look disproportionate. Jaw surgery is an option you explored and are trying to avoid which is ok. Good luck

Jeffrey Jumaily, MD
Toronto Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

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