What treatment is used for excessive sweating of the face, head and neck?

Doctor Answers 5

Excessive sweating above the neck area

miraDry is not currently indicated for treatment of excessive sweat anywhere except the armpits, although it will be interesting to see if the company expands its utility in the future.
Botox injections may be a possible, although temporary, solution to reduce sweating in targeted areas of the face, head, and neck.
Hope this is helpful, and good luck,Dr. Lim


Palo Alto Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Facial Sweating

Sweating of the face, head and neck can be very frustrating and is unfortunately often difficult to manage. Currently, the most common treatments for these areas are certain prescription topical medications, prescription oral anti-cholinergic medications, or Botox injections. Good luck!

Samantha Hill, MD
Lynchburg Dermatologist

Sweating treatments?

Thanks for this question. MiraDry and miraSmooth are only FDA approved for the underarm area. For treating sweat of the head and neck region, Botox would be more appropriate. Best, Dr. ALDO

Aldo Guerra, MD
Scottsdale Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 190 reviews

Sweating on face

As of right now Botox, Dysport, and Xeomin can be used to address your concerns.  Please see a reputable provider with plenty of experience for optimal results. Hope this helps.

Grant Stevens, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 137 reviews

Botox for craniofacial hyperhidrosis

If oral anticholinergic medications don't reduce excessive sweating in the craniofacial area, Botox injections are ideal for this condition. micro ETS is another option. However, it is associated with compensatory hyperhidrosis.Read my free ebook about craniofacial hyperhidrosis on the link below. Hratch L Karamanoukian MD FACS

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