How can I get rid of puffy nipples without surgery? (photo)

Hi. Im 21 and I'm suffering from puffy nipples. It makes my chest look feminine and even sticks out of my shirt. I've been working out for almost 2 years now trying to build chest muscle to get rid of it but I'm afraid it's just adding to the femininity of my chest. I have never been overweight so I don't know what brought this about. I've tried everything but can't seem to get rid of this embarrassment. . Is there any non-surgical solution to this? if not, how much am I to pay?

Doctor Answers 5

About Gynecomastia and Puffy Nipples Complex

The male breast is composed of glandular tissue and fatty tissue. An excess in either type of tissue can cause the chest to take on the look of gynecomastia. Gynecomastia can affect #men of all different body types. There are different types of #gynecomastia. Several common factors can cause gynecomastia including excessive levels of #estrogen, natural #hormone changes, use of recreational drugs or alcohol, medications and their associated side effects, and, various health conditions. Also, there are different types of #gynecomastia.

"Puffy Nipple Areola Complex" is among the most common forms of gynecomastia. This gland and/or adipose tissue accumulation can be located under the areola or can be slightly extended outside the areola, causing the areola to appear dome shaped.This form of #Gynecomastia can be found in all age groups but is more common in young adults.

As each case is different, it is vital that you consult with a board certified plastic surgeon who is experienced in male breast surgery. The surgeon should determine if you are a suitable candidate for male breast reduction by liposuction or glandular excision. It is also crucial to have a plastic surgeon who is well-versed in the gynecomastia condition can determine if there is firm breast tissue beneath the areola that is causing the nipples to project (which is often the case), and if so, how much of this glandular tissue can be removed to create a flat appearance.



Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 96 reviews

Puffy Nipples

Hi osharif,

Thanks for the post and photos. It appears that you have puffy nipples which is due to excess breast tissue under the areolas. This cannot be treated without surgery. I recommend that you be seen by a plastic surgeon experienced in gynecomastia surgery to determine if there are any underlying causes. If not, then you would be an excellent candidate for surgery.

Sincerely,

Dr. Dadvand

Babak Dadvand, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 39 reviews

Only Surgery Works for Puffy Nipples

Puffy nipples can be reduced by removing extra breast tissue directly below the areola and nipple. It is often done under local anesthesia as an office procedure. Addtional breast tissue fullness outside of the nipple area is usally removed with liposuction. Exercise will not help this condition.

Correct puffy nipples without surgery

You will need some kind of surgical treatment to reduce puffy nipples. 
This can either be with surgery through a small incision around the areola (out nipple) or with laser liposuction. 
Laser liposuction is effective but for puffy nipples alone, surgical excision is probably easier, less expensive and more precise.

Puffy Nipples

The short answer is that there is no completely non-surgical treatment for the puffiness of your nipples. You could consider a minimally invasive procedure that we have found works extremely well to correct this puffiness. Smartlipo can be performed under local anesthesia in the office with just a tiny incision in the armpit. The laser from the smartlipo breaks up the tissues behind the nipple causing the puffiness and special instruments are placed through this incision that then removes these broken up tissues. It works extremely well to flatten the nipple without having to put a scar on your nipple or breast. If the nipples are the only part of the chest that needs treating the total cost is around $3,500.

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.