After tummy tuck surgery, is it normal for your legs to go to sleep, numb, while you are asleep at night?

I had a tummy tuck with lipo in my flanks 1 week 1/2 ago. Ive noticed, at least 4 nights, my left leg goes to sleep, in the middle of the night. Is this usual or not? I wake up, and once i move my leg around it goes back to normal. I do sleep with the post op garment, and on a recliner.

Doctor Answers 5

After tummy tuck surgery..................

the short answer is no. Is your garment too tight? Are you sleeping in an abnormal position. You should consult your operating surgeon as soon as possible.


Perth Plastic Surgeon
3.9 out of 5 stars 22 reviews

After tummy tuck surgery, is it normal for your legs to go to sleep, numb, while you are asleep at night?

This may be due to nerve irritation, the compression garment or other causes. Discuss this with your surgeon. 

Karol A. Gutowski, MD, FACS
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 65 reviews

Leg numbness

This would be unusual and not a typical post operative complaint for abdominoplasty.  The surgical field does not involve any significant concerns that would effect low extremity nerves.  However, position for long duration under anesthesia or post operative positioning at home during recuperation could potentially contribute to these symptoms.  Certainly you should follow up with your surgeon, but ambulation and repositioning while will likely enable this to resolve.

Rodney E. Schmelzer, MD
Salt Lake City Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

Legs fall asleep

This is most likely due to a change in your sleeping position. Unusual pressure/position in particular areas can cause nerve/blood supply compression and be the source of this temporary sensation you are experiencing.

Robert H. Hunsaker, MD
Miami Plastic Surgeon
4.4 out of 5 stars 71 reviews

After tummy tuck surgery, is it normal for your legs to go to sleep, numb, while you are asleep at night?

Best to call your surgeon to address this issue after surgery of nigttime leg numbing. Could be dehydration, nerve issues. 

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.