Which surgery is best for my nose?

When I was young my nose was straight but I used to fight a lot with my siblings and occasionally had nose bleeds I started to realise my nose was bent to one side but it isn't that obvious from the front but from the sides and from underneath it is visible. My nose runs all the time,I can't breathe that well through my nose, when I smile my nose leans to the side, my side profile is aesthetically unpleasant &my voice is nasal.

Doctor Answers 12

Nose Surgery

Hello.  Please understand that the definitive answer to your question rests with an in-person consultation.  Based on your description, you may be suffering from a deviated septum (wall between the two nostrils).  This requires an examination to diagnose.  A septoplasty may be combined with a rhinoplasty (nose reshaping surgery) to affect the appearance of the nose.

If you like, please follow the link below.  The article on Septoplasty contains useful diagrams and may assist in your understanding of the process.  Hope this is helpful.  Best wishes.  Dr. Shah


San Antonio Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Nose

Your photos reveal a dorsal hump and a bulbous nasal tip.  These could be corrected along with correction of the asymmetry by a rhinoplasty.  Find a board certified surgeon who does frequent rhinoplasty for the best result.  Good luck.  Donald R. Nunn MD  Atlanta Plastic Surgeon

Donald Nunn, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 43 reviews

Septorhinoplasty Candidate

Dear BB30, Your nose shows some deviation and an examination would allow to see what the causes of your obstruction are. Most likely you would be an excellent candidate for a septorhinoplasty. The "septo" portion of the procedure will address your breathing function and the "rhinoplasty" portion will address the hump and cosmetic concerns that you have with your nose. Best regards, Michael V. Elam, M.D.

Michael Elam, MD
Orange County Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 199 reviews

Rhinoplasty

What you want done is completely up to you.Rhinoplasty typically starts at $5,500 depending on the area you live. To make sure you get the best possible result, the surgeon should perform a detailed exam of the nose and provide a realistic goal that you and your surgeon agree upon. Rhinoplasty are permanent, but with age facial features do change. Find a surgeon and go for a consult, I think you would be very happy after the surgery.

Elliot M. Heller, MD
New York Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.6 out of 5 stars 87 reviews

External nasal changes with airway obstruction

Based on your history and complaints of breathing obstruction, it appears that you have a post-traumatic nasal-septal deformity.  It would respond to a rhinoseptoplasty, which can often be done by a closed surgical approach.  It may be considered reconstructive by your insurance plan as determined by your surgeon.  You would have thorough consultation by a board certified plastic surgeon that has considerable experience in nasal surgery.  This surgery whould improve the appearance and function of your nose.  Good luck.

John M. Weeter, MD
Louisville Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

Rhinoplasty for dorsal hump removal and straightening the nose

 A closed rhinoplasty approach can address straightening the crooked nose, and removing the dorsal hump. Since the dorsal hump is composed of both bone and cartilage, it must be surgically shaved down in order to remove it and to give an aesthetically pleasing profile. Osteotomies of the nasal bones are required to straighten the crooked nose. There are many issues inside the nose that can cause nasal obstruction such as a deviated septum, turbinate hypertrophy, valve collapse, allergies and chronic sinusitis. Each one of these issues are treated differently with either medications or surgery. Examination of the internal portion of the nose will determine what the cause of the obstruction is. Functional nasal surgery to improve air flow can also be performed at the same time as a cosmetic rhinoplasty.

William Portuese, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 129 reviews

Deviated nose with breathing problem

you must have your nose thoroughly examined by a qualified ENT surgeon ,besides deviates septum enlarged turbinates ,you may have other causes of nasal obstruction such as a polyp or concha Bullosa,best would be a Facial plastic surgeon who can take care of both the aesthetic and functional aspects

Brajendra Baser, MS, DNB
India Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review

Rhinoplasty for the deviated nose with nasal hump and bulbous tip.

A rhinoplasty will correct all of the issues involved both aesthetically and functionally. The nose can be straightened so that your airway is much better etc. See a very experienced rhinoplasty surgeon who does noses that look natural.

Toby Mayer, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.7 out of 5 stars 32 reviews

Nasal Obstruction

You do have a deviated asymmetrical nose. You need an examination to determine the cause of your nasal obstruction which can be corrected while also making the desired cosmetic changes such as the removal of your nasal hump.

Richard W. Fleming, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 38 reviews

Breathing problems

The cartilages of your nose may have become damaged due to the trauma, or even from the swelling associated with the trauma. If you are unable to breathe, correction of the internal nasal passages with a septoplasty or straightening of the internal divider of the nose will likely help.
The "hump" on the lateral view appears to be both from excess cartilage lower in the nose and excess bone closer to the forehead. Trimming the cartilage and shaving down the bone, should correct the profile appearance.
Correcting the breathing problems should correct the nose bleeds, as they are more likely when you breathe on one side only due to a deviated septum. If you have a prominent blood vessel, it can be cauterized while the septum is being corrected.

John Standefer MD

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.