Crows feet area much worse after revision face lift? (Photos)

I'm 56 and had a facelift with fat transfer 3 yrs ago. After healing my crows feet were far worse with folds rather than lines appearing when I smile. I then had a lateral browlift to try and correct this. It helped a little but I still get skin folds when I smile. It doesn't look natural. Will botox, filler or some other non surgical treatment help; or will removal of the excess skin in front of my ears work; or will I need a revision facelift to re-drape the skin correctly? Thank you:)

Doctor Answers 9

Botox for Crows Feet

Thank you for you question and pictures, unfortunately surgery tends to not target crows feet therefore botox would relax the muscle and should smooth and soften the lines.  All The Best 

Treatment of Crow's feet

Thank you for posting good pictures of your crow's feet.  These photos show that your main problem is related to the hyperactive muscle around the eye rather than excess skin.  Repeating a facelift would not help to reduce these lines.  Regular use of Botox would be the best treatment for your crow's feet. 

Best wishes!

Dr. Konstantin

Konstantin Vasyukevich, MD
New York Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 36 reviews

Crows feet lines and folds

Unfortunately, surgery rarely corrects crows feet. They are caused by muscle contraction and over time, can etch the skin. releasing skin doesn't usually solve the problems


Botox and fillers however can produce dramatic improvement


that is the route I would pursue


best of luck

Crow's feet & Botox

I always think it's smart to start with the least invasive option so yes, give Botox a try. It can be very effective on crow's feet although it isn't going to address the deeper wrinkles. If the Botox doesn't deliver enough tightening for you then speak with a board certified plastic surgeon about a revision facelift.

Kindly,

Kouros Azar

Kouros Azar, MD
Thousand Oaks Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 21 reviews

Smile lines worse after face lift

Thank you for asking about your face lift effect on your crows' feet.

  • I am sorry this happened.
  • I would definitely start with Botox as it is easy to have done and may be very effective.
  • If it is only partially effective, keep up the Botox but discuss with your surgeon  a revision to re-drape the skin in those areas.
  • Always see a Board Certified Plastic Surgeon. Best wishes  - Elizabeth Morgan MD PHD FACS

Crows feet and Botox

Your pictures show dynamic lines when you smile, I agree that the facelift would have resulted in the excess bunching that you see.  Botulinum toxin injection/Botox will help greatly if performed in the right location and quantities.  You have a lot of muscle around the eye (orbicularis occuli) and you have a very strong smile muscle, so you will always have bunching even if you had Botox, however the injection of Botox will minimise this appearance, Laser resurfacing and RF skin tightening could also help. Hope this is helpful.  

Crows feet

While botox may help, you have some very deep lines here with extra skin.  Tough to really tell from these pictures, but it looks like the lateral brow is still low.  Doing a revision temporal browlift and midface lift, and adding a little more fat to the area would help.  Some laser resurfacing would also help to tighten the skin.  

John J. Martin, Jr., MD
Coral Gables Oculoplastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 25 reviews

Increased Crow's Feet

Thank you for your pictures.  I agree with Dr. Echavez, BOTOX® would be a wise step to take to help minimize this issue.  Best wishes


Treatment of crow's feet after facelift and lateral brow lift

My recommendation would be to try Botox to help with the crow's feet you see after your facelift and lateral brow lift.  Although your pictures do not show your entire face, it does not appear to me that you have any excess skin that needs to be excised.  

Michael I. Echavez, MD
San Francisco Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

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