Severe abdominal bloating caused by diastasis recti?

Every time I eat my stomach distends so much that I feel like I can't move. I can't suck it in and sometimes it hurts to move. It is so hard and bloated that I am embarrassed to be seen in public. I do have a tummy tuck scheduled this year but I am worried that it may not resolve my issue. Is the pain and bloating due to my weakens muscles or is this something else?

Doctor Answers 3


It is difficult to determine the cause of your abdominal bloating based on what you described.  I would recommend a visit to your primary care doctor and discuss your concerns.  A tummy tuck will help strengthen your abdominal wall, but if your bloating is from a digestive concern, you could experience more discomfort after surgery.  I would look into it further before proceeding with surgery.

Houston Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 28 reviews

Abdominal bloating

The symptoms that you are describing may very well be due to a rectus diastasis or alternatively could be to another issue such as IBS.Prior to undergoing plastic surgery, I would advise that you followup with your primary care doctor to make sure that everything else is aligned prior to proceeding.I wish you the best of luck.

Severe bloating

You should raise these concerns about stomach bloating with your primary care doctor so that it can be investigated further and I would also recommend you discuss these problems with your plastic surgeon prior to having surgery.  Your bloating is not likely related to your stomach muscles and if the stomach muscles are tightened during the tummy tuck (which is usually the case) the bloating symptoms could be worsened.  Best of luck with your stomach issues as well as your surgery!

Jeffrey A. Sweat, MD
Sacramento Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 37 reviews

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