Will Nose Continue to Grow After Nose Job?

I'm getting a Nose job this friday and my doctor didn't really talk to me much about it. The only part I'm nervous about is if my nose will continue growing even after the surgery? I'm 15 years old.

Doctor Answers 20

Nose will grow after Nose job

Your nose will continue to grow after a rhinoplasty procedure. Ligaments do stretch and the skin could continue to sag. It should not be a concerning issue as in most cases it should be a very slow process. Best of luck!


Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 19 reviews

Do noses continue to grow after Nose Job?

At age 15, most women have stopped growing. Men can often continue growing to age 18 or beyond. If you have stopped growing, your nose has stopped as well. If not, your nose may grow along with you, even after surgery.

Contrary to popular belief, our nose does not continue to grow as we get older in adulthood. Rather, the ligament connections between the bones and cartilages that make up our nose loosen and stretch. This can make the tip of the nose droop with gravity even though it has not actually grown. This may happen to you when you get much older, but is probably less likely in anyone who has had rhinoplasty previously, because some of the internal scar tissue from the surgery would make drooping of the tip less likely.

I hope this helps!

Jason L. Swerdloff, MD
Palm Harbor Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.6 out of 5 stars 27 reviews

Teenage Rhinoplasty

In someone who’s only fifteen there’s significant potential for continued growth following rhinoplasty surgery. For this reason, rhinoplasty should be approached with caution in patients in this age group

                Physical maturity is important for several reasons. Operating on the nose before growth has stabilized can have significant consequences. Under these circumstances continued growth following rhinoplasty surgery can result in nasal changes that may alter the appearance of the nose. In addition, rhinoplasty surgery performed at an early age has the potential to disrupt facial growth.

                Although opinions vary from surgeon to surgeon regarding the earliest age for rhinoplasty, most surgeons feel that an age of 15 to 17 for women and 16 to 18 for men is appropriate. Each patients situation is unique and several factors may alter these numbers. In children with congenital nasal birth defects or post-traumatic nasal deformities, surgery may be indicated at an earlier age. In this group, significant nasal aesthetic deformities, deviation of the nasal septum, and difficulty breathing may make early intervention a necessity.

                If you’re considering rhinoplasty surgery as a teenager, it’s important to discuss the issue with your parents. If everyone agrees that rhinoplasty is an option, consultation with a board certified plastic surgeon would be appropriate. The vast majority of patients who undergo rhinoplasty as teenagers report high levels of satisfaction. 

Richard J. Bruneteau, MD
Omaha Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 194 reviews

Noses Don't Grow After Rhinoplasty

We typically do not perform rhinoplasty on anyone until after their nose has already finished growing. That would be around age 14 to 16 for a girl and about age 15 for a boy. Now, as we age, our noses do sometimes appear elongated owing to the downward-pulling effect of gravity over many decades. However, they are not actually growing. I hope this helps.

Jonathan Kulbersh, MD
Charlotte Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 69 reviews

Rhinoplasty Advice

First off, in regards to your concern that your doctor “didn’t really talk to [you] much about it,” I would suggest considering a new plastic surgeon. A good doctor will sit you down at your consultation appointment and will explain to you the details of your surgery. Personally, I take this time to answer any and all of my patients’ concerns, comments, and questions and am sure to be sensitive to the fact that this is a big decision in my patients’ lives. That being said, it is likely that your nose will indeed continue to adapt as you mature. Since you are only 15 years old, and females go through puberty until about age 18, your body is probably still changing. It might be best if you wait a few more years before undergoing your nose job so as to attain the best, most permanent results. Although the female and male face continues to mature till 18 - it is safe to do rhinoplasty on a female at age 14 and males at age 15 and I do it all the time - the nose doesn't really grow after that much but skin stretches as we age

Sam Rizk, MD
New York Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.7 out of 5 stars 75 reviews

Minimum age for rhinoplasty

Fifteen to 15-1/2 years old is the minimum age for a rhinoplasty on a woman, and 17 to 18 years of age is the minimum age for rhinoplasty on a young man. It can certainly be performed at that age without any difficulty. Make sure you are having a rhinoplasty performed by a facial plastic surgeon that has performed thousands of rhinoplasties.

William Portuese, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 146 reviews

Teenage Rhinoplasty

If your surgeon did not answer all your questions and thoroughly discuss the procedure with you,schedule another consultation with him/her prior to surgery. If your still not satisfied, get a second opinion.

It is appropriate to have rhinoplasty after puberty. With aging everybody's nose gets larger secondary to gravity. However, it is not truly growing.

Clarify what the surgery is all about; then enjoy your new nose if you decide to proceed.

Richard W. Fleming, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 39 reviews

Nasal growth and rhinoplasty

Hi Jazmine,

It's concerning that your surgeon hasn't spoken much to you before surgery. It's important that you have all of your questions answered prior to surgery and feel comfortable prior to commencing with surgery.

An interesting study was published this year in the Archives of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery (Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2008;134(12):1288-1293). The authors found that the average age for the nasal growth spurt to stop in girls was 13.1 years. Using the variance within the population they studied, they concluded that 98% of girls were done with nasal growth at the age of 15.8 years. They therefore concluded that rhinoplasty could be performed safely in all girls at age 16.

It's very unlikely that your nose will grow after surgery, but it is possible to a small amount. If you're not comfortable with that answer, you should delay surgery.

Best of luck!

Sam Jejurikar, MD
Dallas Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 95 reviews

Your nose will continue to grow as you age

The nose has been shown to grow as people age. Much of this growth is actually due to parts of the nose losing its resiliency and structure that it had at a younger age. Cartilages lose their structure and relax and this can make the nose drop from gravity which ultimately lengthens the nose. The ligaments that hold the nose together also loosen over time and this also allows the nose to descend vertically.

Also with age, the skin can thicken. Sebeceous gland growth can happen to some degree in everyone but is most pronounced in people with rosacea who can have a rhinophymatous type of changes to the nose. But when the time comes when your nose is larger, there are ways to make it smaller again through rhinoplasty.

Philip Young, MD
Bellevue Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.2 out of 5 stars 86 reviews

Rhinoplasty as a teenager

First, if you haven't been given adequate information regarding your rhinoplasty, then I suggest you call your doctor's office and seek those answers. Second, if you are of adult size and have completed puberty, then it is probably OK to go ahead with a rhinoplasty. Can the nose grow? Yes, through life the nasal cartilages may grow a bit, but it is unlikely that this will be a noticeable change.

Steven Wallach, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.1 out of 5 stars 29 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.