Devastated after Rhinoplasty cause my nose is wider.Can feel the bones are more widely spaced. Don't think it's swelling.(photo)

Before rhino I was pretty from the front. My narrow bridge made my eyes look big. I wanted a better profile so had closed rhino to remove hump. Told him I want to look the same from the front, but he made my bridge wider & tip projection seems worse. My profile isn't ideal either. It's only been a month, but I have thin skin & took Arnica & Bromelain. I know there's swelling but the bones are spaced more widely, will they really get narrower? I'm in entertainment so don't have a year to wait :(.

Doctor Answers 11

Swelling after rhinoplasty

At one month after rhinoplasty, the nose is still significantly swollen. I would wait at least 6 months after surgery to consider any additional surgery. If you feel an opening between the nasal bones in the middle, you may have an open roof deformity after hump removal. This requires osteotomies, which means breaking the nasal bones so they can be moved together which would narrow the bridge as you desire.  If you didn't have to wear a splint and had no black eyes after surgery, it's possible the surgeon did not perform this important step. Go over what your surgeon actually did and give them a chance to make you happy if you can agree on a plan. Be patient. If that doesn't work out, make sure you find an experienced revision rhinoplasty surgeon.

Bakersfield Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Wider nasal bridge after rhinoplasty

I am sorry you are upset with your results.  As others have noted, it is early postoperatively.  While the bones that compose your bony bridge may not actually be widened, you may have what we call a residual 'open roof'.  Even if osteotomies were done to break the bones and move them inward, a residual 'flat top' can occur.  In some cases, it can be corrected.  I would discuss the details of your surgery with your surgeon.  S/he may be able to allay your concerns.  Hopefully, as the swelling goes down, and the apparent widening will disappear.
Dr. Most

Sam Most, MD
Bay Area Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 60 reviews


If it has only been one month since surgery, you are definitely still swollen.  You need to give it some more time before assessing the final result, up to about one year.  Your photos really look as I would expect just one month after rhinoplasty.

Ronald J. Edelson, MD
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Rhinoplasty Concerns

Typically after a hump is reduced then osteotomies (breaking the nasal bones) needs to be performed to move the bones together to narrow the nasal bridge. I would speak with your surgeon and see what was done during the procedure and discuss your immediate concerns. If you do need osteotomies and they were not performed then this may be done without waiting the typical one year time frame for revision surgery. Again,  speak with your surgeon and thoroughly discuss your concerns and hopefully this will provide you with the answers you need during your recovery. If you are not happy with the conversation you may always get a copy of your operative report and seek a second opinion. Best regards, Michael V. Elam, M.D.

Michael Elam, MD
Orange County Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 196 reviews

Widened Nose

The best person to consult with is your rhinoplasty surgeon.  If a hump was taken down during your surgery, often times osteotomies are needed to prevent a widened bony appearance in the location of the previous hump.  Please consult with your rhinoplasty surgeon or a board certified specialist who can help you.

Kimberly Lee, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

rotation rhinoplasty candidate for wide nose

 Since it has only been one month since your primary procedure,  you are going to have to wait at least a year before undergoing a  revision rhinoplasty. Followup with  your original rhinoplasty surgeon and express your concerns. 

William Portuese, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.7 out of 5 stars 126 reviews

Devastated After Rhinoplasty Because Nose Appears Wider

Sorry to hear about your post-rhinoplasty concerns.  You should discuss your concerns with your rhinoplasty surgeon, the only person who really knows what is going on.  Ask your rhinoplasty surgeon if spreader grafts were placed and whether osteotomies were performed during your surgery.  Good luck and be well. 

Michael Persky, MD
Encino, CA

Michael A. Persky, MD
Encino Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 34 reviews

Speak to your surgeon to see if he did osteotomies

Early in the recovery this may be swelling but it's best to ask your surgeon if he did osteotomies to bring the bones in. If the plan was to bring the bridge down , even slightly, and he/ she did not do osteotomies this may be the reason you look wider. This can be relatively easily remedied by doing osteotomies if they were not done.

A lot of surgeons will say they do not "break the bones" but oftentimes this is a necessary part of the surgery. Be patient and rest assured this can be corrected

Peyman SOlieman, MD

Peyman Solieman, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 3 reviews

Devastated after Rhinoplasty because my nose is wider. Can feel the bones are more widely spaced so don't think it's swelling?

It is always difficult to assess the final result so early in the healing process, but swelling is present.

Kenneth Hughes, MD

Los Angeles, CA

Devastated after Rhinoplasty because my nose is wider. Can feel the bones are more widely spaced so don't think it's swelling?

Unfortunately you are not going to get much of an answer in this forum. It would require a review of the operative notes and an exam. Go back to your surgeon to get some answers.

Ronald V. DeMars, MD
Portland Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.