Crater deformity after gynecomastia surgery? (Photo)

I has surgery 6 weeks ago, including gland removal (70g each) and liposuction (150ml each). I had fairly large breasts before and poor skin elasticity. I am okay with he results (any result compared to how I was before are good anyway), but not entirely happy. When I touch my breasts now they feel "hollow" and there are dimples. Is this what people call crater deformity? What should I do? After and before photos attached.

Doctor Answers 7

Concerned About Crater Deformity Following Gynecomastia Surgery

It's still early in your recovery from gynecomastia surgery. As you heal, the area may feel “lumpy” and irregular. This, too, decreases with time, and massaging these areas will help soften the scar tissue. The #compression garment helps reduce the swelling, and the longer it is worn, the more quickly you will #heal. It can also assist in the retraction of the skin. In the future, if you are still experiencing your crater concern, its best to ask questions of your surgeon or their nursing staff.  They may possibly be able to address the issue with fat grafting or cosmetic fillers if you are a good fit.


Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 96 reviews

Crater deformity?

Hello and thank you for your question and photos. I also don't see any crater deformity at this time. The body needs a chance to remodel things after surgery so this can take anywhere from 6 months to a year! I would give it some time and see how things turn out after some time. You seem to have a pretty good result!

However, if later on you should notice that your concerns have not changed, you should definitely bring this back up with your plastic surgeon and see what his recs are. Usually, for deformities after gynecomastia correction, fat transfer can be used to fill in some of the deficit areas.

Congrats on your great result and Wish you the best of luck on your recovery

Ankur Mehta MD

Ankur Mehta, MD
Sugar Land Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

Gynecomastia Surgery Recovery

Hi simsim2016,
Thanks for the post and photos. Like my colleagues here on this thread, I do not see a crater deformity on the photos you posted. That being said, at 6 weeks you are also very early in the healing process and things will continue to improve over the next 6 months. I would consult with your plastic surgeon regarding this issue but it looks like a good result based on the photos.


Sincerely,
Dr. Dadvand

Babak Dadvand, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 39 reviews

Crater deformity after gynecomastia surgery?

I do not see the problem you are describing. It is too early to evaluate your results. Follow up with your surgeon.

Gynecomastia Result

From the photos it looks like you have a pretty good result.  A side view might show different but I do not see any notable depression.  Things also change over time and usually for the better so see your surgeon again in 6 weeks for a recheck. 

Crater deformity

Thank you for the photos and question but an examination is really needed so see som experts in your area- whatever is going on can be corrected 

Dr Corbin

Frederic H. Corbin, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 59 reviews

Crater deformity after gynecomastia surgery?

Congratulations on having undergone the gynecomastia surgery; based on your photographs, I think that your plastic surgeon has done a nice job for you.  A "crater deformity" involves a (usually visible) contour depression under the nipple/areola complex.  I do not appreciate this deformity in your photographs.

I would agree with your assessment that over all your outcome is quite a significant improvement; I would suggest that you continue to appreciate the improvement and not be too critical. Massage of any contour irregularities may be helpful. Best wishes.

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.