Scars too high on breast. Any suggestions? (photos)

I am six weeks post op. I had my implants exchanged from 475 to 325s I had capsular contracture and lift. My scars seem too high and I'm worried they are going to stay this way. They were like this from day one. Did my implants bottom out? Can I have this fixed?

Doctor Answers 7

I am worried about my breast scars and their position.

You should discuss your #breast scars position with your #plastic Surgeon. Don't forget to at least begin #scar therapy with products like #ScaRxTape to help minimize them. 


Newport Beach Plastic Surgeon
4.4 out of 5 stars 27 reviews

Scars too high on breast. Any suggestions?

If your scars remain too high, they can be lowered by removing more skin a the bottom.  However, I would wait at least 6 months before doing anything.  This can be a fairly simple correction for you.  Discuss this with your PS.

Christopher Costanzo, MD
Thousand Oaks Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 33 reviews

Revision Augmentation Mastopexy

Hello,

Your implants are sitting too low already, especially one of them, and this will get worse over the next few months. Usually at 6 months is time to consider revision, which you'll need to re-position your implants higher on the chest wall, which should place your inframammary incision in the fold. If you surgeon is not an ABPS certified/ASAPS member who is a revision breast expert, you should go on a few second opinion  consultations. 

Gerald Minniti, MD, FACS
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 79 reviews

Breast Scars with Lift

You are early in the recovery process but normally the implants will drop somewhat. This can result in the scars appearing even higher. You would need to wait months to fully evaluate your progress as you are stil healing in the lower aspect of the breast. 

This, fortunately, could be adjusted to help improve the location of the scar in the breast crease.

You should see a board certified plastic surgeon in your area to get a formal opinion through an in-person consultation.

Best of luck,

Vincent Marin, MD

San Diego Plastic Surgeon

Vincent P. Marin, MD
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 42 reviews

Scars too high on breast. Any suggestions?

Dear Paldride

You are in the early phase after surgery. Your scars is still healing. I agree that your scar location appears too high. I think you would be served best by waiting until your scars are fully healed and the breasts fully settled. Then if the only issue is scar location, your surgeon can revise that predictably. At that point, the breasts are stable and there are less variables and your surgeon can reposition your scars in your inframammary folds.

Afshin Parhiscar, MD
Bay Area Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 49 reviews

Scars too high on breast after revisionary breast surgery.

I am sorry to hear about your concerns after the revisionary breast surgery. Although it is generally to evaluate the long-term outcome of the procedure performed, I think that your concerns are understandable. If, in the longer term, the concerns remain, then your situation can be approved upon.  Additional skin/tissue removal (revision breast lift) and/or adjustment of the breast implant capsules (repositioning of breast implants) MAY be necessary.   Continue to follow-up with your plastic surgeon who will be your best resource when it comes to accurate assessment, advice, and/or meaningful predictions. Best wishes.

Scars

First off, your scars are very pink, which is very normal for this period of scar maturation.  Over time, as in several months, the pinkness will fade and they will seem less obvious.  The position of horizontal scars on the bottom of the breasts is not necessarily too high, as they will be well-hidden within swimsuit tops.  I can't say for sure if your implants have bottomed out, but from your pictures (which are taken from the angle looking upwards slightly) their position looks okay right now.  

Allen M. Doezie, MD
Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 32 reviews

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