What dose of cortisone or kenalog should I be getting? (Post gynecomastia scar tissue)

Hi I've had three gyno ops. Seems I'm prone to scarring.I still have a small disc of scar tissue under each nipple. Size is maybe about 1cm by 1cm. I won't be having surgery again but I have spoken to some private doctors who advised they could do injections to help with the scar tissue. As a guide how much Mg/Ml would they use per nipple? I need a rough idea as I wouldn't want a dangerous amount injected and would like an independent opinion based.on the size stated. Many thanks

Doctor Answers 5

Scars from Gynecomastia Surgery

Your incisions will go through a maturation #process following #Gynecomastia #surgery. For the first few months they will be red and possibly raised and/or firm. As the scar matures, after 6-12 months, it becomes soft, pale, flat, and much less noticeable. You may experience numbness, tingling, burning, “crawling”, or other peculiar sensations around the surgical area. This is a result of the #healing of tiny fibers which are trapped in the incision site. These symptoms will disappear. Some people are prone to keloids, which is an abnormal scar that becomes prominent. If you or a blood relative has a tendency to keloid formation, please inform the doctor.
Bruising and #swelling are normal and usually increase slightly after the removal of any tape or foam. The bruising will decrease over 3-4 weeks, but may last as long as 6 weeks. The majority of the swelling will be gone within the first 3-4 weeks. However, it may take 6-9 weeks to disappear completely. Also, as you heal, the area may feel “lumpy” and irregular. This, too, decreases with time, and massaging these areas will help soften the scar tissue. The #compression garment helps reduce the swelling, and the longer it is worn, the more quickly you will #heal. It can also assist in the retraction of the skin. If you have any concerns about #healing, its best to ask questions of your surgeon or their nursing staff.In the future, if you are concerned with scars, with your surgeon's approval you may be able to use scar management treatments such as Biocornuem,  Scar Guard, Scar Fade,  IPL Laser,  Yag Laser,   5fu/Kenalog for thick scars, or silicone sheeting.

Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 94 reviews

Start small

Usually in treating scars I start with a 1/1 mixture of kenalog 10 with local anesthetic.  Sometimes for a stronger mixture I add in 5 FU to the combo

Cortisone for post gynecomastia scarring?

A judicious dose of steroid deep into the area of firmness can be helpful in differentiating thickened scar tissue from retained fibroglandular tissue. The amount injected will vary based on the area of firmness and the patient's response to injection. It is important that conservative amounts of steroid be injected and done so deeply into the retained mass to minimize the risk of subcutaneous atrophy and skin changes. Consult with a board certified plastic surgeon experienced in gynecomastia treatment.

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What dose of cortisone or kenalog should I be getting? (Post gynecomastia scar tissue)

Thank you for your question.

It is difficult to assess without seeing any pictures. What you are describing could be left over glandular or fibrous tissues or it could be scar tissue. It is unlikely to be hypertrophic scaring which responds to kenalog injections. Please talk to a Board Certified Plastic Surgeon in your area who can examine you and help you with your problem.

All The Best !

Ajaya Kashyap, MD
India Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 132 reviews

What dose of kenalog

 From what you're describing, rather than scar in my opinion, this is retained fibroglandular retro areolar breast tissue and can only be removed by surgical excision. Placing a depository steroid in this location will only thin the overlying skin and not melt away the breast gland tissue.

Marc J. Salzman, MD, FACS
Louisville Plastic Surgeon
4.6 out of 5 stars 38 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.