6 weeks post Facelift: Black mark appeared under the skin in my temple wound, is this spitting stitches? (photo)

Hi there. I am 6 weeks post op and healing well but just noticed today a small black looking area under the skin in my temple wound. It wasn't there before. Is this one of those spitting stitches or something else and should I get it seen to or just leave it? Thanks

Doctor Answers 10

Facelift #faceliftrecovery #fatgrafting #beauty #tmbcosmeticsurgery #woundhealing

Dear Nige54

Thank you for your question and photo!  Congrats on your surgery.  Please review with your surgeon.  The area looks ok in general.  The spot could be a suture, or hair follicle.

With Warm Regards

Trevor M Born MD


Toronto Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 107 reviews

Face lift - dark spot appearing after 6 weeks

Thank you for asking about your face lift.

Yes, this looks like a spitting suture. You should see your plastic surgeon to have it removed.

Always see a Board Certified Plastic Surgeon. Best wishes  - Elizabeth Morgan MD PHD FACS

Black mark after facelift

I can't say with any certainty what this is just from a photograph. It could be a spitting stitch. I would recommend that you contact your surgeon and let them know about this. More than likely, it will go away with a little antibiotic ointment.

Andrew Campbell, M.D.

Facial Rejuvenation Specialist

Quintessa Aesthetic Centers

Andrew Campbell, MD
Milwaukee Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.7 out of 5 stars 26 reviews

Post facelift

This looks like a suture starting to come out through the skin.  THis can create a little bleeding which is why you have a scab.  See you doctor and they should be able to pull it out.   

John J. Martin, Jr., MD
Coral Gables Oculoplastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 25 reviews

Facelift, dark lesion following

Your scar is still very immature. This dark bump in the scar probably represents a suture abscess and needs to be treated with drainage and topical antibiotic. If indeed there is a stitch in the tissue this will have to be removed in order for the infection to clear.

Richard O. Gregory, MD
Orlando Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

Spitting Suture

This black mark is likely to be an extruding permanent suture or a small area of blood surrounding an entrapped hair follicle.  This is an issue that your Surgeon can quite easily address in the office.

Stephen Prendiville, MD
Fort Myers Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 82 reviews

Black mark in temple 6 weeks after facelift

It is a bit difficult to tell, from just a photograph, what might be causing the black mark in your temple 6 weeks after your facelift.  It is possible that it could be due to a suture under the skin, or it could be a small collection of blood under the skin.  It could also be a small area of skin necrosis, but this would be unusual to occur 6 weeks after your surgery.  I would contact your surgeon so that you can be evaluated in person to determine what the cause is and your surgeon should be able to improve the issue for you.  

Michael I. Echavez, MD
San Francisco Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

Stitches

Good day,

This does look like the dermal stitches may have bled and you are trying to extrude them. This is not dangerous nor an emergency, however some brief attention from your surgeon would be able fix this and it should heal up nicely.


Best wishes!

Spitting stitch?

Yes, this appears to be a spitting stitch. Schedule an appointment to see your surgeon to have it removed. 

Kindly,

Kouros Azar

Kouros Azar, MD
Thousand Oaks Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 21 reviews

Suture likely

A suture is likely but given the size of the pigmented patch in the area I wonder if retained hair might also be the cause. either way, a drop of local anaesthetic will allow your surgeon to rectify the problem.

Hope that helps. 

Adam Goodwin

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.