What is this white mark on my nipple after gyno surgery? (Photo)

I saw surgeon, about a month ago when these photos were taken he thought they make be stitches working there way out. The marks do not seem to be getting much better (3 months post op). He also said something today that if I had swelling under the nipple (which I believe I do) that it can contract and make these marks? I guess I'd like a second opinion. Could it possibly be a Montgomery gland? Any recommendations for treatment?

Doctor Answers 3

Post-Op Complications including Lumpiness

Possible complications resulting from gynecomastia surgery include the following -

  • Asymmetry during the healing process
  • Lumps or firmness under skin (Which you may see here next to your nipples)
  • Prolonged swelling (edema)
  • Skin Pigment changes
  • Prolonged redness of the incision

LUMPINESS: As you heal, the area may feel “lumpy” and irregular. This, too, decreases with time, and massaging these areas will help soften the scar tissue.

As with all operations, pain and discomfort varies greatly from patient to patient. Generally, one should expect that pain medication will be required for the first several days. Continuing discomfort can last varying amounts of time. If you find yourself uncomfortable at all with these lumps it is best to visit your surgeon to have the area examined and make sure that healing is going well. Best of luck!

Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 94 reviews

Stitch marks under the areola

Not sure what these are but they look like hash marks or scar lines; maybe you can have your surgeon revise them.

Arian Mowlavi, MD
Orange County Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 41 reviews

Scar or dissolving stitches

Scar tissue proliferates for 6 weeks and remodels for the next year, massage helps speed up this natural process.  Dissolving stitches usually are completely broken down by 8-12 weeks as the scar tissue improves tensile strength.  Knots can act like splinters and create an inflammatory reaction or poke out through the skin.  Your surgeon can help you remove it if this happens.

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.