Is this a "dog ear" app 5 months after upper blepharoplasty? (Photos)

I am massaging faithfully every day as per instructions. Haven't really seen much of a change in the last 2 months. Scars are still quite raised but I can't imagine this "bag" at the end will disappear. There is a slight one on the other eye also but not as bad. Any thoughts?

Doctor Answers 11

Follow-up With Doc

That looks like a hypertrophic scar I would go back to your surgeon to have him look at it before taking any actions. He will be the best one to give you what options you have next. It's not a dog ear it's just excess skin that needs to be excised. Surgeon may recommend  a small scar revision. Goodluck!


Fayetteville Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.7 out of 5 stars 106 reviews

Uncorrected lateral hooding

Hi there. Greetings from the UK! I agree with others to say that this is neither a scar nor a dog ear but just untreated lateral hooding. It's not a great result but it's not a big deal to sort out. Most surgeons should be able to address this pretty easily. Various techniques exist for treating out canthal dermatochalasis from extending out the incision into a crows's foot incision, using a 'fish-tail' incision, performing a lateral brow lift if there is lateral brow ptosis/ instability. Easy to sort out. So not a major complication but a minor unfavourable result which is easily rectifiable. Best wishes David


David Cheung, MBChB, Bsc(Hons), FRCOphth
Birmingham Oculoplastic Surgeon

Eyelid

I agree with my colleague. That looks like a hypertrophic scar. Go back and talk to your surgeon. There are things that can be done.

Tracy E. McCall, MD
Milwaukee Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review

S/P Blepharoplasty

The incision for your blepharoplasty is poorly placed. You may need a second opinion for revision if your surgeon is not inclined to revise. Best wishes with your decision.

Sara A. Kaltreider, MD
Charlottesville Oculoplastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 3 reviews

Scar of blepharoplasty

The eyelids usually heal very favorably and the scars are seldom noticeable. You seem to have a hypertrophic scar. This may get better with time but it is not likely, if it has not happened by now. The direction of this scar also needs to be changed to fall in the natural crease. You should discuss it with your surgeon first and if you do not get a satisfactory response you may wish to seek a second opinion. 

Bahman Guyuron, MD
Cleveland Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 21 reviews

This is not a dog ear but it is not a nice result either.

Please do not live with this.  Please ask your surgeon to fix this.  If you and your surgeon have had a breakdown in the relationship, please find another surgeon to help you with this issue.

Kenneth D. Steinsapir, MD
Los Angeles Oculoplastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

Hooding

The look of the lateral eyelid region is likely related to brow ptosis. Lifting the brow will likely soften that. If you do not want a brow lift, then more skin can be removed from the side.

Steven Wallach, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.1 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Excess skin after blepharoplasty

Based on your pictures, this is not a "dog ear", it is just excess skin that will need to be excised and the scar revised to achieve optimal cosmetic outcome.

Edwin Ishoo, MD
Cambridge Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.4 out of 5 stars 20 reviews

You need fue them surgery

A revision of your blepharoplasty would be the best course to take. It would address both the residual fold and the thickened scar. Good luck!

Elba Pacheco, MD
Annapolis Oculoplastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

Eyelid scar revision

It appears that some fine tuning of your scar is indicated.  It is unlikely that the appearance of the excess skin fold will improve that much at this point of your recovery. A rather simple scar revision could significantly improve the final result. See your plastic surgeon for  evaluation. 

Boris M. Ackerman, MD
Newport Beach Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 52 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.