One eye has a different shape than the other. What can I do? (Photo)

Please excuse the makeup in the photo, it is the last taken of me during theatre. I have noticed more recently in photos that one eye is notably different than the other. Looks wise I prefer the one on the right, and have come to be quite self conscious of the two being different. Is there anything you can suggest I might do?

Doctor Answers 6

Eyelid asymmetry

Thank you for your question and nice photo.  The left and right side of all humans are not exact mirror images, and most have some mild asymmetry that can often be appreciated upon close observation.  You are no exception.  With that said, based on the photo provided, the left upper eyelid is positioned slightly lower that the right.  The best next step, besides doing nothing, is to follow up with your doctor for an in person consultation.  


Newport Beach Oculoplastic Surgeon

One eye has a different shape than the other. What can I do?

Hello. Thank you for your question and photo. Actually, your eyes and brow are quite pretty, very nicely shaped, and the asymmetry is well within the normal range. Look at news casters, friends, models and you will find that most of them are at least as asymmetrical as you. In fact about 90% of people have a right eye that is lower than the left because the skull is smaller on the right.

There is really no procedure that you should have for the small amount of difference in your eyes. Try to focus on the positive. You are truly fortunate to have nicely shaped eyes. Additionally, I would never have noticed the difference in your eyes if I had seen you in person.

Thank you again for your interesting question and photos, and be happy.

Eyes are different

Before you do anything I would recommend you study some of the eyes of famous models or actresses and you will see many minor asymmetries such as yours. Cindy Crawford has exactly the same issue as you but with her left eye being slightly more open than the right whereas with you it seems to be on the right ( and less than her). This usually will not show up when you see someone smiling but only in repose. The cause is variable from an orbital volume issue to a lower lid issue to an upper lid issue, or a combination. However, as you can see this minor asymmetry did not in any way affect her career or her self esteem as she is known as one of the most beautiful women in the world.  Your eyes are also quite beautiful and I would strongly recommend you not do anything unless the situation progresses or was not there a few months ago. If the situation appears to be new or progressive I would see an ophthalmologist,  plastic surgeon, facial plastic surgeon, or occuloplastic surgeon for an evaluation.

Other models with facial/orbital asymmetry - Christy Turlington, Christy Brinkley ( left eye more open)

Grady B. Core, MD
Birmingham Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

Asymmetric eyes

saskikoi, no one can or should answer this question based on this photo only; I find your eyes attractive but I do note the L upper lid may or may not be slightly ptotic. we are all somewhat asymmetric. See an oculoplastic surgeon with years of experience. Good luck!

M. Sean Freeman, MD
Charlotte Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 45 reviews

See oculoplastic specialist for eye size asymmetry

Best to see an oculoplastic specialist for evaluation as it is difficult to tell from the photo.  Your right eye appears large or more bulgy than left side (or left side is smaller or more sunken). 

Mehryar (Ray) Taban, MD, FACS
Beverly Hills Oculoplastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 61 reviews

Asymmetry

Hello, it is hard to determine what the best suggestion based on your photo would be. I would recommend having a consultation with an oculoplastic surgeon to exam you to best determine your options. Best of luck!

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