Do I Have Capsular Contracture 5 Months Post-Op Breast Implants? (photo)

Hello Drs-I am 5 months post-op and my left breast is firmer and not as pliable as my right.Also,the crease has risen up since surgery.In addition,there is a dent on the outerside at the bottom of my left breast(not noticeable in picture).The first picture here is 3-weeks post-op, and the last three are 5 months post-op.The last one was taken with my body tilted back.You can see the right sits comfortably,while the left seems to have a 'bulge',a more defined edge.Do I have Capsular Contracture?

Doctor Answers 22

Talk to your surgeon

If you've just recently noticed that your breasts have changed in shape, feel, and how they project from your body, then you're right - you could be developing capsular contracture. While you can feel for yourself for any changes that indicate capsular contracture (signs include hardness, swelling, pain, and a rounder, more ball-like shape), please book an appointment with your surgeon who may examine you to see if it actually is. Your examination sometimes can involve an ultrasound, mammogram or MRI. The sooner you do this, the sooner you can be diagnosed and treated. Earlier detection is always better.

Treatments for capsular contracture include medications, therapeutic massage and stretching, as well as implant removal/replacement. Good luck!

Capsular contracture while pregnante

There are many suspected causes of a capsular contracture but the most likely causes are implant contamination, bleeding and infection. Surgical technique is critical as prevention is the cure for capsular contracture. The risk of a capsular contracture when implants are placed above the muscle is in the 20 to 30% range. When the implant is placed either subfascial or sub muscular the risk is in the 4 to 7% range. The no touch technique was first described in 1991. This means avoiding any surface contamination of the implant during insertion. The no touch technique combined with irrigation with antibiotic and betadine solution as well as use of a funnel has greatly decreased the risk.

Jeffrey Zwiren, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

Do I have a capsular contracture 5 months postop breast implants?

Hello! Thank you for your question! Physical examination will determine if you have capsular contracture. The look and feel of hardness surrounding your implant is seen and/or felt. At its worst, you experience pain. It may also cause distortion of your breast. What has caused it will be in question. 

Your surgeon will likely recommend implant massage and may add the medication Singulair. If these fail, surgical correction may be suggested. It is a matter of surgeon preference as well as what is seen during your procedure that will determine whether or not a complete capsulectomy is performed. If significant capsule formation is seen intraoperatively, a full capule removal may be warranted with a drain in order to completely remove all of the tissue and allow better adherence of your breast back to its normal anatomic position down on your chest wall. Irrigating with certain medications may also be if benefit. If minimal contracture is seen, it may be possible to leave the capsule, or place cuts within the capsule to allow better adherence. It truly is dependent on what is seen with your capsule and the issues that may be causing you to have such a procedure (e.g., contracture from rutptured implant vs pain vs simple pocket adjustment, etc).

Without knowing your issues and without an examination, it is difficult to tell you what may be the best thing for you. I tend to favor performing capsulectomies in order to create a fresh pocket, reshape the pocket, allow better shape and adherence of the overlying breast. I would discuss your issues with your plastic surgeon who will assist you in determining the right modality for you. Hope that this helps! Best wishes!

Lewis Albert Andres, MD
Scottsdale Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 22 reviews

Capsular Contracture at 5 months postop?

It is hard to diagnose capsular contracture without an in office exam.  Thank you for your question.  Capsular Contracture is one of the main risks of breast augmentation.   Classic signs are:

1.  hardness/tightness of the implant
2.  change in implant position (typically migrates towards the collarbone)
3.  increased pain and stiffness on the associated side.
Based on your description, you should see a board certified plastic surgeon for evaluation of capsular contracture.    If present, I would recommend a capsulectomy (removal of scar tissue) and implant exchange. 
Factors to consider:
1.  If your implants are above your muscle, you may want to consider switching to underneath the muscle, which lessens the risk of capsular contracture.
2.  If your implants are above the muscle and you desire to keep them there, you may benefit from the use of a textured implant.
Dr. Gill

Paul S. Gill, MD
Houston Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 81 reviews

Capsular Contractures of Breast Implants

 If you had very small breasts to begin with and then had large breast implants placed, then your breast skin envelope may simply still be tight, and will gradually stretch out to accomodate the breast implants

It is difficult to tell from you photos whether or not you have capsular contractures of your breast implants.  A physical examination is needed. 

Fredrick A. Valauri, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon

Capsular Contracture breast Augmentation

It looks like from the photos an examination would give you a definitive diagnosis.  This can be fixed with revisional surgery.  I would recommend working with your surgeon unless you have a communication issue.

Revision breast augmentation usually works.

Hi.

1)  Hard to tell exactly the cause, but one side looks quite different than the other.  Also you have a sharp line above your left breast and what looks like a prominent scar under your right breast.

2)  In a couple of months you may want to consider a revision.  With good planning, a good result can usually be achieved.

George J. Beraka, MD (retired)
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Capsular contracture?

Unable to tell without an exam.  May be a contracted capsule and may be malposition of the implant.  Donald R. Nunn MD  Atlanta Plastic Surgeon.

Donald Nunn, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 36 reviews

You may have CC

What you describe could definitely be capsular contracture. Tightness, firmness and breast distortion are all signs of CC. You mention that your breast is firmer, the crease has actually risen up and the affected breast appears distorted.

You should see your surgeon for an assessment. 

Ronald Levine, MD
Toronto Plastic Surgeon
4.7 out of 5 stars 19 reviews

Do you have CC?

You should meet with your surgeon to have it checked out. 

Although capsular contractures following breast augmentation can occur just about any time, most women start having symptoms around three months after their breast implant surgery. This is because it takes some time for a capsule to form and then to scar down (contracture).
Capsular Contracture is a condition in which the capsule surrounding the implant thickens and contracts, squeezing the implant making it overly firm or hard and often changing the shape and position of the implant. As the capsule contracts it moves the implant further up your chest wall making upper portion of your breast too large and unshapely. It is more far more common in nicotine users (e.g. smoking, vaping or nicotine gum or patches).

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.