Puffy Nipples, Gynecomastia or not ?

I don't know it's Gynecomastia or not , but I have issue of puffy nipples , Some times they become puffy , but some times normal , I was trying to find out the what's this , when my nipples become puffy I press my nipples they start contract immediately , I have no idea whats this ......

Doctor Answers 5

About Gynecomastia w and Puffy Nipples Complex

The male breast is composed of glandular tissue and fatty tissue. An excess in either type of tissue can cause the chest to take on the look of gynecomastia. Gynecomastia can affect #men of all different body types. There are different types of #gynecomastia. Several common factors can cause gynecomastia including excessive levels of #estrogen, natural #hormone changes, use of recreational drugs or alcohol, medications and their associated side effects, and, various health conditions. Also, there are different types of #gynecomastia.
"Puffy Nipple Areola Complex" is among the most common forms of gynecomastia. This gland and/or adipose tissue accumulation can be located under the areola or can be slightly extended outside the areola, causing the areola to appear dome shaped.This form of #Gynecomastia can be found in all age groups but is more common in young adults.

As each case is different, it is vital that you consult with a board certified plastic surgeon who is experienced in male breast surgery. The surgeon should determine if you are a suitable candidate for male breast reduction by liposuction or glandular excision. It is also crucial to have a plastic surgeon who is well-versed in the gynecomastia condition can determine if there is firm breast tissue beneath the areola that is causing the nipples to project (which is often the case), and if so, how much of this glandular tissue can be removed to create a flat appearance.

Also, men who suffer from large #areolas may notice that after breast surgery, the skin of the chest muscles will tighten, causing the areolas to tighten and diminish in size. This is a result of the removal of glandular and/or adipose tissue.


Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 96 reviews

Puffy Nipples, Gynecomastia or not ?

Hi jack fan,
Thanks for the post. It is difficult to answer your question without a physical exam. It is impossible to answer it without photos. The reason why your nipples/areola contract when you press them is because you are stimulating them which causes the areola to contract, making it smaller and look less puffy. If they become puffy when they are not being simulated then you may have excess tissue behind the areola causing the puffy nipples. I recommend you see a plastic surgeon who specializes in gynecomastia surgery to evaluate you.

Sincerely,
Dr. Dadvand

Babak Dadvand, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 39 reviews

Gynecomastia

Jack
I appreciate your concern, but physical exam and photos would be helpful. However, if you do have mild Gynecomastia, it is usually treated by liposuction alone. The scars are small and well hidden. Insurance may or may not cover it, depends on your policy. Check out the link below to an article I wrote about Gynecomastia, as you may find it helpful. Seek out a board certified plastic surgeon in your area, good luck!

Robert M. Tornambe, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

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Puffy Nipple

It is normal for the nipple to contract with stimulation.The stimulation can be a pinch of something cold for instance.A warm shower has the opposite effect. In situations like this a phot is helpful.

Gynecomastia

This is a very common question. The areola which is the dark circle around the actual nipple, has muscle in it and when it is stimulated the muscle contracts and pushes the tissue beneath it down. That's when things look flat. When it's completely relaxed it sometimes will give the appearance of being "puffy". 

Sherwood Baxt, MD
Paramus Plastic Surgeon
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These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.