I had EVLT 2 weeks ago. Can I lay in the sun now?

Doctor Answers 4

Sun and EVLT

Thank you for your question.  I am sure most physicians would agree that sun should be avoided following any procedure.  In general, it is always best to protect your skin from sun damage.  The treated vein is a scar and any new scar needs time to heal - out of the sun.  Give yourself a month off and when you do go back - don't forget to apply sufficient sunblock, hat and umbrella!  Keep your legs under an umbrella for now.

New York Vascular Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review

Sun exposure after Vein Treatments

This is a commonly asked question especially since I practice in Florida.  I usually recommend waiting as least 2 weeks following any vein treatment before getting sun burn over the areas treated.  This is just a generality however.  The longer one can avoid the sun post treatment the better.  I also recommend a sun block of at least 30. The bottom line is that to avoid hyper pigmentation, one should use a sun block, avoid burning over the areas treated and wait for the treated areas to heal.

John Landi, MD
Naples General Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

Sun exposure after EVLT

The main reason to avoid sun exposure after any vein treatments is to minimize the risk of hyperpigmentation which is a darkening of the skin over the closed vein.  If the bruising is completely resolved and the skin overlying the vein appears normal, it should be ok to go in the sun.  Use a sunscreen with at least an SPF of 50.

Lisa Perez, MD
Atlanta Physician
5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review

Sun after vein treatment

The main issue with sun exposure after Venous treatment is staining from the blood left behind the could become permanent.  So the longer you wait the better but if you must go on In the sun you have to use a very high SPF good quality sunscreen and re-apply every one to two hours and they're still maybe A risk of pigmentation with the increase of exposure

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.