How long does the scar tissue heal after gynecomastia surgery (lipo-excision)?

I had the surgery 4 months ago. I still feel some puffiness beneath the areola. Is it like the scar tissue caused by liposuction keeps contracting until it accumulates underneath areola complex? my doctor said It's not a gland, but I feel it is because I am lying on my back, my chest is completely flat. However, it is not when i am standing and i feel my doc thought he cut enough of the gland but maybe he didn't, so does the scar usually accumulate underneath the nipple after contracting? thanks

Doctor Answers 2

Scar tissue after gynecomastia surgery

 Four months is still with in healing time post surgery, I usually give patient six months before evaluating results. Areas of firmness around the surgical site are not uncommon and are usually scar tissue. This can be massaged lightly to help dissolve.  Give yourself a little more time but consult your surgeon again if you were still having concerns.  #scartissue #Postop 


Orange County Plastic Surgeon
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How long does the scar tissue heal after gynecomastia surgery (lipo-excision)?

I am sorry to hear about your concerns after gynecomastia surgery. Your surgeon will always be your best resource for accurate diagnosis, advice, and/or meaningful reassurance.  It will be your best interest to allow for at least 6 months to one year to pass after surgery before evaluating the final outcome of the procedure performed. At that point, it will be possible to determine whether any residual "mass" is related to residual breast tissue or maturing scar tissue. Treatment of course will vary depending on this diagnosis. Again, key will be close follow-up with your surgeon and ongoing patience once acute complications have been ruled out. Best wishes.

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