Swelling, Lumps and Indentations after Facelift/Neck Lift and Liposuction

I am 4 Months post-op and in my mid-50's and normal weight. I am concerned as I still have some Swelling, Lumps and Indentations along jawline and under chin and at neck. No defined jawline (Both Sides of Face.) Is this something that will correct itself, or would steroid injections or a revision help me? Thank You

Doctor Answers 22

Revision Is Probably Necessary

Irregularities under the chin and at the neck can occur as a result of uneven liposuction, local differences in healing with uneven skin contraction, or inflammation due to small collections of blood or fluid (seroma) in the early healing period. Generally, irregularities that have not resolved by 6 months will not resolve. Revision usually involves undermining the skin and doing some kind of neck lift procedure, although sometimes undermining with a liposuction cannula can help. Indentations along the jawline are usually due to uneven liposuction, and those are best corrected with fat grafting.  At 4 months, most of the healing has occurred, and some kind of revision among the options above will likely be necessary.

Swelling, lumps, and indentations after facelift/neck lift

Thank you for your question. Based on your photograph, it seems that you may need to reconsider a revision with a board certified plastic surgeon. It would be unlikely that steroid injections alone would correct the lumps and address the jaw definition. Thank you for your question. I wish you the best of luck.

Lumps/bumps after facelift in a difficult neck

Your neck looks like it was a challenging one, and your surgeon may have performed any of a number of procedures to correct the heaviness of your preoperative neck.  These lumps/bumps may be part of the normal healing process or evidence of that some intervention needs to be undertaken. I suggest you bring up your concerns with your surgeon.

Sam Most, MD
Bay Area Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 60 reviews

Swelling and lumps after 4 months

I would discuss with your surgeon. If the tissues have softened, he could consider a revision and/or steroid injection. I don't think it is necessary to wait a year, if he feels it woont resolve on its own.

Best of luck

Unusual lumps under the jawline post #facelift: rule out pre-existing sagging submandibular glands

Thank you for your question.

I think I see sagging submandibular glands in your pictures.

Submandibular glands are glands normally hidden deep and under the jawline but like everything else in the human body, they can sag. They sometimes get addressed during a necklift/facelift procedure but requires experience and knowledge as there is potential for serious bleeding.

Thick digastric muscles could also be the cause but those would be almost midline.

Large glands can sometimes be treated with Botox.

Visit your plastic surgeon and initiate the conversation.

Hope this helps!

Best regards,

Dr. Marc DuPere, Toronto Aesthetic Plastic Surgeon

Marc DuPere, MD
Toronto Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 60 reviews

Revision facelift for lumps in the neck

Thanks for your photo submission.

As you likely know, the healing after a big surgery like a facelift will continue for over a year.  You certainly don't want to consider any surgery prior to that time.

You will need to see your surgeon for a full discussion to outline your outcomes and expectations.

However, it does look like you've had some volume removed from the submentum but have quite a bit of loose skin and  platysma banding that are persisting.  Unfortunately I think you'll need to have a revision facelift and platysma plication (including neck lift) to achieve the results you deserve.

If you see a revision specialist, you really would benefit from your before and after photos as well as the operative note.

Best of luck to you.
Dr. Hobgood

Todd Christopher Hobgood, MD
Phoenix Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 44 reviews

Bumps after a facelift

Thanks for the question, its always difficult to determine what is happening without seeing you in person, however lumps/bumps are common after a facelift and can take up to a year to fully resolve. 

Everyone is different, so i suggest you visit your surgeon for some advice. 

James Bonaparte, MD, MSc, FRCSC
Ottawa Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Inadequate correction of the neck will probably require surgical revision.

From the photograph it looks as though there are still platysma bands and loose skin of the neck. Depending on the facelift this might not have been in area directly treated. Nevertheless, for this issue to be resolved a revision will be necessary.

Vincent N. Zubowicz, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 32 reviews

Swelling, Lumps after Facelift/Neck Lift = consider re-evaluation #facelfit #necklift #lumps #drmesa

Most of the healing process  after a facelift and neck lift completes by the 3rd month after surgery. However, the final result is seeing 1 year after the procedure. Therefore swelling , bumps and lumps might be seeing more than 3 months after the surgery.

In my practice, when patients present with not well defined jaw line or smooth neck after a facelift and neck lift, they  may require a revision surgery depending of the physical findings. Revision surgery is best performed after 1 year post surgery (or at least 6 months)  to make sure the tissues are well healed for a second surgery.

John Mesa, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 97 reviews

Lumps and indentations after facelift

Considering you are now over 4 months out from your procedure, I wouldn't expect your concerns to improve on their own, or from steroid injections (though it may be worth a try since the injections are so easy). I would discuss your concerns with your surgeon. More than likely, some sort of revision will be necessary.

Andrew Campbell, M.D.
Facial Plastic Specialist
Quintessa Aesthetic Centers

Andrew Campbell, MD
Milwaukee Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.7 out of 5 stars 26 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.