How Long After 300cc Submuscular Breast Implants Can I Go Running?

I had breast augmentation one week ago (300 cc, under the muscle). I run around 50 miles a week and want to know when I can start running again without risk to the implant?

Doctor Answers 27

Running after breast augmentation

By one week after breast augmentation there is little harm you can do to your implants if you resume running. Like any sports injury you may have to back off at the point of soreness so a treadmill may be a good way to start so you aren't far out if you have to shorten a run. Double up the jog bra for support, and run with your hand higher and elbow fully bent to help relax your chest.

Best of luck, peterejohnsonmd.com


Chicago Plastic Surgeon
4.1 out of 5 stars 39 reviews

Wait 3 weeks after sub-muscular breast augmentation to do long distance running

Thank you for your question. Of course you must follow the directions of the plastic surgeon who performed your surgery.

In my practice I encouraged patients to wait 3 weeks before very vigorous exercise such as long distance running. Long-distance running increase his blood flow and the recent surgical areas of the breast and experienced swelling and discomfort with rapid increase his in heart rate and blood flow for the first 2 weeks postop.

Exercise after breast implants

It depends on the size of implants and extent of surgery, so best to ask your surgeon. For most patients, I would recommend avoiding running or any strenuous exercise for six weeks.

Anindya Lahiri, FRCS (Plast)
Birmingham Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

Running after augmentation

I have my patients avoid running for 4 weeks after surgery. That may be somewhat conservative but you surely do not want to get a hematoma from resuming vigorous exercising too quickly. I am okay with a augmentaion patient walking on a treadmill at 2 weeks. Hope you make an uneventful recovery!

Ann F. Reilley, MD (retired)
Baton Rouge Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Exercise after breast augmentation

In general, I usualy let my patients go back to aerobic type acitivities by 3-4 weeks post-op and heavy lifting by 6-8 weeks.

Steven Wallach, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.1 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

Running after breast implants

Your surgeon should give you very specific activity instructions, and I would recommend following those.  Typically, I ask patients to avoid cardio for 2 weeks when the risk of bleeding is the highest, then start excericising slowly (no running) from 2-6 weeks.  This means walking, stair-climbing, biking, etc.   Full activity is allowed at 6 weeks.  Running or jogging or any other exercise that causes a lot of up and down movement can have an effect on the implants and the surrounding healing tissue.   It's not the implant that is at risk - it's where the implant sits in your breast pocket, and how the tissue stretches and heals.

Running after breast augmentation

It is always best to follow the recommendation of your board certified plastic surgeon as to your exercise tolerance. Your surgeon will know about your tissues, how much he had to do with the pocket, etc. When you do get the OK, make sure to wear very good sports bras. Also ease into it. Don't run a marathon the first day. We see patients post op and let them know their limitations at their appointment. Running is usually about 8 weeks out. Please talk to your plastic surgeon and make a plan about your exercise tolerance.

Jeffrey J. Roth, MD, FACS
Las Vegas Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Running after Breast Augmentation

Consult with your surgeon about the types of activities that are acceptable post-surgery. It is important that you not engage in strenuous activities in the first three (2-3) weeks after surgery. My own personal recommendations to my patients are start walking as much as you want to, as soon as you want to. Then progress as desired to high-reps, low-resistance exercises. Slowly progress for 6 weeks, after which time there are no restrictions. I advise my patients to refrain from strenuous physical activity such as heavy lifting with your arms or jogging for 6 weeks. Aerobic exercise will raise your blood pressure, which could cause late bleeding and harm your result. Once you begin exercising again, start gently and let your body tell you what it can tolerate. Don’t rush!! It is important that you follow your doctor's instructions so that you get the best aesthetic results.
#breastrevision #breastimplants

Larry S. Nichter, MD, MS, FACS
Orange County Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 125 reviews

Running after breast augmentation

Thank you for your question. You definitely want to follow your own surgeon's post-op activity instructions. This is a general guide I give to my patients:
1) No heavy lifting or strenuous activity for 6 weeks.
2) Resume walking at a leisurely pace right after surgery (e.g. 2 mph)
3) At 2 weeks, you can walk 2 miles at 2mph
4) At 3 weeks, you can walk 3 miles at 3mph
5) At 4 weeks, you can walk 4 miles at 4mph
6) At 5 weeks, you can jog 5 miles at 5mph
7) At 6 weeks, you can resume all activities, but listen to your body and use discomfort or tightness as a guide so you don't over do it.

Typically- 6 weeks!

Recovery varies from patient to patient following breast augmentation surgery. We generally recommend that patients avoid strenuous activities including running for at least 6 weeks following surgery.
Running in the immediate post-operative period has the potential to cause the breasts to bottom out. The constant bouncing of the implants within a freshly formed breast pocket can cause the pocket to expand inferiorly. Capsule formation acts to stabilize the implant pocket, but may take weeks to occur. In some cases, 2 weeks may be adequate while longer periods may be necessary in other cases.
Physics suggest that larger implants would be more likely to stretch the pocket and skin while compressive support bras would minimize the phenomena.
If you’re considering an early return to running, it’s important that you discuss the issue with your plastic surgeon before proceeding. Your surgeon will have important information regarding your situation and when it’s safe to resume this activity.

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.