I was exhausted and fell asleep (laid the side of my face down on my arm) an hour & 15 mins after my Botox, is this a problem?

If I am going to have an eye droop because of this, when would it occur? Do I have to keep worrying for the next two weeks that it might happen? Would it happen within 24 hours? Just had the Botox this evening and I am worried Sincerely, -fell asleep on the couch girl in Arizona.:)

Doctor Answers 11

Botox and Falling Asleep

Botox should not be affected by anything you do outside of the office once injected. Please speak to your physician if you are concerned. Best, Dr. Emer.


Los Angeles Dermatologic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 165 reviews

Sleeping on face after Botox

I would not recommend that anyone do this. However, I've had more than a handful of patients ask me the same question after Botox and none have caused any problems with their injections. If you're doing to develop an eyelid droop or other issue it will likely develop within the first couple of weeks. I hope this information is helpful for you.

Stephen Weber MD, FACS
Denver Facial Plastic Surgeon 

NO!

There is just about NOTHING that you can do or not do that affect where your Botox is or will go. Just go about your normal routine and enjoy the effects of the Botox.

Kirk Moore, MD
Salt Lake City Plastic Surgeon
4.2 out of 5 stars 39 reviews

Side-effects of Botox

You should have no concern. The main problem patients get into after Botox is rubbing or massaging the area. Drooping will not occur during a later period of time after 3 days or so

Melvin Elson, MD
Nashville Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

Worried about eye droop from Botox

Thanks for your question. It can take up to a week for Botox to take full effect, so you may need to watch for a bit longer.  I don't think you need to be too worried that your results will be ruined, though; I've had similar things happen to patients before and they all did well.  If you do happen to develop lid droop, know that it doesn't usually last for more than a couple of weeks and there are eye drops that can help to reverse it. Best of luck to you!

Alix J. Charles, MD
Hinsdale Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

I was exhausted and fell asleep (laid the side of my face down on my arm) an hour & 15 mins after my Botox, is this a problem

Thank you for submiting ypur question.  Sleeeping 1 hour after ypur injection should not affect your final results.  Best Wishes. 

Botox and aftercare

Botox tends to set within an hour after treatment and other than commonsense avoidance of vigorous rubbing of the areas treated, there is no particular aftercare.  It used to be thought that position such as lying down could affect Botox but that was never proven and is no longer the advice given.  So there should be no issue with falling asleep an hour and 15 minutes after a treatment.  If still concerned, I would recommend to follow up with the treatment provider.

Mark Lupin, MD
Victoria Dermatologic Surgeon
4.3 out of 5 stars 3 reviews

Botox and laying down

Thank you for your question. Chances are you'll be fine if you had previously good experiences with the text. The laying down after Botox timeframe has not been studied.  If something does happen, then it should happen around the same timeframe as the rest of your results.

Botox and falling asleep

You will be fine.  If botox traveled that easy it would migrate south while standing upright due to gravity.  The rules about position are really just more tradition.

Jacquelyn Dosal, MD
Miami Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Pressure on Area after Botox

We don't want heavy massaging or intense exercise for the first few hours after Botox injection to allow the Botox to "grab" at the intended site,  but I wouldn't expect any adverse events after falling asleep on it even after an hour.  Don't lose any (more) sleep over this! I think you will be just fine.

Melissa Toyos, MD
Nashville Ophthalmologist
4.8 out of 5 stars 27 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.