Dual plane breast augmentation?

What weight lifting exercises will I have to give up after having a dual plane breast augmentation?

Doctor Answers 10

Dual Plane Breast Augmentation and Weight Training

General guidelines suggest that women with larger drooping (ptosis) breasts that do not want a breast lift often have the implant placed above the muscle, although another option, #DualPlane, has become more popular. In the Dual Plane method, the implant is placed under the pectoralis muscle but the breast tissue is also release, in part, from the muscle. Those patients with minimal breast tissue should usually have the implant placed beneath the pectoralis muscle for more soft tissue padding.

You should avoid heavy lifting and strenuous activity for six weeks. You may, however, do normal activities at any time if they cause no pain or discomfort. Let your body tell you what you can or cannot do. Aerobic exercise will raise your blood pressure, which could cause late bleeding and harm your result. Once you begin exercising again, start gently and let your body tell you what it can tolerate. Don’t rush!! It may require the full 6 weeks before you can do any upper body work-outs, yoga, etc.


Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 96 reviews

Dual Plane BA and Weight Lifting

I cannot for see you giving up any exercise routine including lifting of weights with the dual plane or other breast augmentations techniques for that matter. Make sure you have guidelines as to when it is safe to resume these exercises

Weightlifting with dual plane breast augmentation

Dual plane implant placement is very common for patients with low body fat, including fitness models and athletes. I have had several patients in these professions, and they've all maintained and/or increased their strength in the chest area after surgery. The only thing you should be concerned about is following post-op care instructions closely, so that you can recover properly before you start exercising again. This is very important.

BBA

I wouldn't allow any heavy weight-lifting.  If you want to be a bodybuilder, then you should consider a sub glandular or subfascial implant.

Asif Pirani, MD, FRCS(C)
Toronto Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 35 reviews

Breast augmentation and weight lifting

Dear Jurico,

I generally council my patients that body build or are professional athletes to consider placing the implants above the muscle. Any below muscle placement, dual plane or otherwise may have an associated "hyperanimation deformity," or shifting of the implants with pectoral muscle flexion. So, it is not imperative that you will have to "give up" weight lifting exercises, it is just that you may have to accept shifting of your implants with the exercises. Good luck!

Dual plane breast augmentation

While every surgeon is different, our recommendations are to stay out of the gym for 3-4 weeks after breast augmentation, and to minimize pec work-outs for 6 months post-op.

You can continue with biceps, triceps, lats, deltoid, etc after the initial period of healing - as long as you are careful about your muscle isolation technique as you exercise.

Weight lifting after dual plane breast augmentation

Thank you for your question. Be sure to address these concerns and this question to the plastic surgeon who is performing your breast augmentation.

Because of the breast implant is placed beneath the chest muscle during duel plane breast augmentation any activity that requires contraction of the chest muscles will cause deformation and movement of the implants. Generally speaking after duel breast augmentation I ask patients to limit upper body exercise such as weight lifting for 6 weeks.

If you do competitive weight lifting a sub-mammary breast augmentation may be a better option.

Dual plane and weightlifting

Thank you for your question. The key to remember is that any time an implant is covered with muscle, and the muscle contracts, it can distort the shape of the breast. Dual plane is a technique where the muscle partially covers the implant. Any contraction of the overlying will cause distortion depending upon the intensity and seriousness of your weightlifting. I would recommend you visit with a plastic surgeon so that your specific exercise is evaluated against your cosmetic goals.

Dr. Ambay

Wesley Chapel, FL

Dual Plane Breast Augmentation and Exercise

Hi there-

When considering the effects of implant placement on your physical activity, I think it is important to understand that there are temporary, self-limiting effects, as well as longer term concerns, and that the degree of concern you should have would depend on the particular exercises you are enquiring about...

In my practice, we have performed dual plane augmentation on even professional athletes, who are able to rapidly return to the work of training and competing, but with some (not cumbersome) restrictions depending on their anatomy and the details of the surgery, in order to avoid deterioration of the outcome over time. Because this is highly dependent on your anatomy and the details of the technique, this is something best discussed with your chosen surgeon.

In my practice, distortion of the breast with exercise is very minor and not as much of a concern.

Weight lifting can affect dual plane decision

It all depends on the intensity of weight lifting that you plan to do. For normal working out, light upper body exercise etc, dual plane should not create any problems. However for very strenuous upper body weight lifting and / or body building, any under the muscle placement, including dual plane could create problems for you with undesirable implant movement with muscle contraction. For serious body builders, I think that sub glandular(subfascial) silicon gel implant placement should definitely be considered. Of course this has to be balanced with the potential downsides of visible rippling if the tissues are very thin, and increased capsular contracture rate. There is no single answer, rather a consideration of all the factors involved.

Jeffrey Hartog, MD
Orlando Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 59 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.