Could you develop Mondor's cord six months after a breast surgery? (Photo)

Hi, can someone develop Mondor's cord six months after a breast surgery? I had a breast implant removal and breast lift on 3/22/16 free of any complications, and recently I was involved in a car accident on 10/7/16. My chest was struck against the steering wheel and two weeks after I noticed the cords under my left breast. Could this be due to my surgery or to the car accident? I am sorry I couldn't figure out how to rotate the picture on this site. Thanks

Doctor Answers 3

Mondor cords

Mondor's cords usually appear within several days of surgery or trauma.  So, more than likely the car accident trauma is the cause.  Warm compresses and massage may help relax the cord.  Good Luck.


San Antonio Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Mondor's cords six months after breast augmentation

Thank you for asking about your breast augmentation.

It is much more likely that the Mondor's cords are from your car accident, specifically from the trauma of the steering wheel on the chest. These cords are thrombosed superficial veins and usually appear with a month after trauma. It would be very unusual for them to appears six months after surgery.

Always see a Board Certified Plastic Surgeon. Best wishes  - Elizabeth Morgan MD PHD FACS

Could you develop Mondor's cord six months after a breast surgery? (Photo)

Good afternoon,

Thank you for your question and I hope that you are healing fine after your accident.  Typically Mondor's bands occur 1-4 weeks after surgery and are not as likely to occur late in the game.  As they appeared after car accident, it may be related to the steering wheel hitting your original incision or nearby.  Although this should settle down soon,  be sure to check in with your plastic surgeon and be examined.

Best of Luck,

Dr. K.

Julie Khanna, MD FRCSC
Ontario Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.