Would Juvederm injections help chicken pox scars? (Photo)

I've had this awkwardly postioned scar for over 15 years now and was wondering if this would be something juverderm can fix temporarily?

Doctor Answers 11

Multiple Options For Scar

Your chicken pox scar can be treated in a variety of ways.  These include subcision, microneedling, laser, and filler.  Filler would be a reasonable, albeit temporary solution but due to the superficial nature of your scar I would select a thinner filler such as Belotero, Volbella, or Restylane Silk.  Injection of this location also needs to be performed with extreme caution due to its highly vascular nature.  Definitely a discussion that needs to be had with a board certified specialist in cosmetic procedures. 


San Diego Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 36 reviews

Filler for chicken pox scar

For that scar you likely would benefit from a few different treatments.  First, would be a subcision of the scar and filler placement. This will get you and immediate improvement.  After which you need to work on remodeling the scar with RF microneedling vs Fraxel.  Good luck with your treatment.

Michelle Ellern, DO
Livingston Physician

Options

You can use a thinner filler for improvement, but that may not be the best choice.  You could also consider surgically revising the scar for a more permanent solution.  For more gradual improvement you can choose microneedling treatments (Skin Pen).

Camille Cash, MD
Houston Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 29 reviews

Subcision Plus A Lifting Filler Can Work Well For A Chicken Pox Scar

The short answer to your question is that Juvederm in my opinion would not be a good choice for treating your glabella chicken pox scar for two reasons. For one, Juvederm is not an ideal lifting filler. Better choices would be Restylane Lyft, which I would opt for in my Upper East Side Manhattan practice, or Hyaluronica 2, which would be my go-to for this in my Israel satellite facility, where a far greater number of regulatory agency approved fillers are available. More importantly, no filler by itself. is likely to be able to adequately lift a heavily tethered down chicken pox scar. More likely the filler would spread to the peripheryof the scar, and in fact a donut like effect may result in which the periphery of the scar would project even more than before, in effect accentuating the central depression of the pox scar. In order to avoid this, subcision lifting can be performed to break up the tethering scar collagen below responsible for pulling the scar downward. This alone may be used to elevate the base of the scar, but in conjunction with the fillers mentioned above is more likely to result in a more acceptable cosmetic improvement. Make sure to seek consultation and treatment from a board certified aesthetic physician.  Best of luck.

Nelson Lee Novick, MD
New York Dermatologic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

Would JVD injections help chicken pox scars?

Thank you for sharing your question and photograph.  If you would prefer to try subcision and filler placement I would advise a thinner filler, such as Volbella.  The material may last for up to a year and with other modalities such as chemical peels you should see nice improvement.  Best wishes.

Nelson Castillo, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 43 reviews

Combination Treatment for Scars - Subcision+Bellafill+RF Microneedling

I wouldn't suggest using Juvederm for the scar, as it won't last very long and has a high affinity to water and may cause more swelling. Bellafill is a much better alternative as it was developed to treat acne scarring and the results may last up to five years. You can have a punch excision, which would cut out the deep scar and instead leave you with a linear scar from the stitches. Or you can have a subcision followed by Bellafill and RF micro-needling such as Intensif, which delivers energy through the needles to heat and break up the underlying scar tissue as well as promote collagen production. 


I'd suggest you see a licensed dermatologist to discuss your treatment options for the best and safest outcome.

Jason Emer, MD
Los Angeles Dermatologic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 165 reviews

Options for scar

I would recommend ablative fractional CO2 laser resurfacing for this. My favorite is the LaseringUSA MiXto Laser because of its Z-patterned handpiece and complete control of settings. The treatment may be done very comfortably in the office. My patients have been very pleased with the results when used for scars and for other purposes (tightening of the skin, decrease in sun damage, reduction of wrinkles and pores, improvement in skin quality). Best wishes with your decision.

Sara A. Kaltreider, MD
Charlottesville Oculoplastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 3 reviews

Filler for Scars

Thank you for your question. I do not think Juvederm is the best choice for a chicken pox scar in this area. I would suggest you meet with a board-certified plastic surgeon who can discuss the possibility of microneedling treatment in this area. This office procedure can smoothen out the skin around and within the scar to give you better texture and appearance. You may need several treatments to achieve your goal. Good luck with your procedure. 

Pox scar on no6-ederm or some other treatment?

I wouldn't use Juvederm. If you were to use filler, Bellafill is my choice for this. It is long lasting. Other treatments you should consider are Infini and subcision. Juvederm just won't last more than 9 months in this area. Use Bellafill after the other treatments I mentioned.

Steven F. Weiner, MD
Panama City Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.6 out of 5 stars 27 reviews

Acne scarring

I don't think fillers are going to help this scar. I think the best treatment is actually removing the scar surgically or laser resurfacing the scar to blend it into the skin. A combination of both treatments may yield best results. Good luck. 

Roni Munk, MD
Montreal Dermatologic Surgeon

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.