Glabella movement after two botox appointments-botox injected in forehead, not in glabella. Is this why? (Photo)

Hi! I received botox injections for my forehead and glabella 6 weeks ago. The injections were only put in my forehead and not in the glabella region. My glabella still has a lot of movement so I had a touch up done about a week ago. The Doctor again put two injections in my forehead above the glabella but never actually in the glabella. Could this be why I still can frown? The photo below is after the touch up a week ago. Thank you!

Doctor Answers 10

Movement After Botox

It appears only your forehead was injected and not your glabella (11’s). These two areas work together and when only one is injected it can result in the glabella lines (11’s). I recommend consulting with an expert and having additional Botox injected into the glabellar area.  Best of Luck!


Summit Emergency Medicine Physician
5.0 out of 5 stars 22 reviews

Frown line movement after Botox

The injection in this are involves 5 different points. Not all are in the middle of the forehead. 2 are in the lateral head of the corrugator muscles. Expecting complete relaxation of the glabella is not always possible with injections, particular with very strong muscles. Over time with serial injections, the muscle weaken and the movement after treatment will gradually be less and less. If you have concerns, discuss with your injector or get another opinion.

Steven F. Weiner, MD
Panama City Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.6 out of 5 stars 27 reviews

Movement after Botox

Thank you for your question.  It is difficult to know exactly where the Botox was injected based on your description.  However, it appears from your picture that the Botox was not injected into the glabella, and therefore you will still have movement there.  I try to be as specific as I can with my patients as to their goals for the injection, so we get it right the first time!  I would discuss your concerns with your injector, as well. 

I hope that this helps!

-David Gilpin

David Gilpin, MD
Nashville Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Botox

From your photo it looks like the Botox wasn't injected into the correct muscles. You need to revisit this with your doctor. Some folks need stronger doses than others, so it's not unusual to require touch ups. Good luck!

Arnold Almonte, DO
Roseville Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 28 reviews

Glabella injections

Proper placement for treatment of the glabella involves 3 muscles (corrugator on each side and procerus in the center) and 5 injection sites. Injection of the forehead will not benefit the glabellar area significantly.

Melvin Elson, MD
Nashville Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

Botox results

I would need to know the muscles that were injected. That being said, you still have muscle activity in the procerus and corrugator muscles (both are glabellar muscles) and so your physician either did not dose appropriately or misplaced the Botox. Hope this helps.

Botox Glabella Injections

Dear ksutherland88:

It sounds and looks like the Botox was not injected into the correct site.  You should follow up with your physician to discuss further.  All the best.

Wrong injection technique

Agree to stop the glabellar movement the botox injections should target the glabella area (procerus and corrugator muscles). Men in general require more botox than women in this area. It sounds like you had injections in your frontalis muscles (forehead) only.

Firas Al-Niaimi, MSc
London Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

Getting The Results You want With Botox

It sounds like the injection wasn't placed well.  I would follow up with your Dr to get clear on your desired results and how to achieve them. Best, Dr. Emer

Jason Emer, MD
Los Angeles Dermatologic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 166 reviews

Botox in forehead

Thank you for your question.  Botox placed in the frontalis, and not directly into the procerus and corrugator muscles (the glabella area), will not soften the glabella.  I wish you good luck with future injections.

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