My smile is ruining my face! Can filler or Botox fix a crooked smile?

The left side of my face slopes down quite a bit so that when I smile it pulls down my entire face. I'm not sure if this is getting worse over time and am worried it may be caused from teeth grinding and I wonder if Botox in jaw would help the problem. Also if there is an option for either Botox or filler to even out smile!

Doctor Answers 3

Crooked Smile

Hey Jenessa, 

Without pictures, or better yet, a face to face consult, it's really difficult to answer your question. I also don't know your age as this can play into tissue laxity and redundancy as well. Botox in the jaw can be used very carefully to combat a very square lower face. Some of us have very strong boxy jaws- this can be caused from  masseter muscle hypertrophy that can be genetic or worsened with chronic gun chewing or jaw clinching at night. 

I always tell my patients we need to be very careful about using botox or filler to "even out" the other side. Yes, depending on the situation we can do this, but to get both sides exactly symmetrical especially during movement can be super tricky. 

Find yourself a plastic surgeon who you trust and can communicate your needs with! Good Luck!


Evans Physician
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Crooked smile

It's hard to make a recommedation without a picture or an in person visit.  An experienced injector can likely inject botox and or fillers in such a way as to even out or improve your smile and facial symmetry.  Hope this helps.  

Dr Odell

Botox or filler

Hi there, Botox and/or filler can be used to even out the features of the face - fix a smile dropping down more on one side, make the face appear more full or thin, etc. I'd need to see your picture to give you a more complete answer but in general yes, filler or Botox can fix some crooked smiles, depending on what's causing the crookedness.

Justin Harper, MD
Columbus Physician
5.0 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

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