Capsulorrhaphy under local anesthesia?! (photos)

I have assymetry s/p breast aug 4 months post op (transax unders, 405 R, 485 L). My plastic surgeon thinks my left breast(your left as well in pic) appears larger because he made the pocket too big. He is recommending a capsulorrhaphy under local anesthesia. Is this procedure normally done under local or general? Do you think this will fix the problem or did he just choose the wrong implant size? Also, does the right breast look normal? Does not look rounded underneath. Please advise. Thank you.

Doctor Answers 3

Capsulorrhaphy under local anesthesia?! (photos)

Without a thorough physical exam before and after your surgery, this is difficult to answer.  From the one picture you have the left breast has some inherent differences, including a larger and lower areola and possibly a smaller size.  Im not sure a capsulorraphy alone would help do much.  

Breast revision under local

You have bottoming out of the right pocket. It can be revised under local with careful dissection and reconstruction of the infra-mammary fold without exposing the implant. Best, Dr. Yegiyants 

Sara Yegiyants, MD, FACS
Santa Barbara Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

Capsulorrhaphy under local anesthesia?!

 I am sorry to hear about your concerns after breast augmentation surgery. Different plastic surgeons have different practices;  in my practice, all revisionary breast surgery that involves adjustment of breast implant capsules and/or manipulation of breast implant themselves are done under general anesthesia in a fully accredited surgery facility. However, if a relatively minor procedure is planned and the patient can tolerate the procedure done under local anesthesia, then the use of local anesthesia is understandable. Best to communicate your questions/concerns directly with your plastic surgeon. Best wishes for an outcome that you will be happier with.

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