Am I dealing with snoopy deformity? What's the best way to correct it? (photos)

I had a BA 5 years ago when I was 110 lbs, 32C + got 350cc mentor moderate profile "gummi bear" implants to 32DDD. These became infected with staph + were removed. My breasts were saggy upon removal and never 100% recovered. A year later, the same surgeon put 300cc implants back in. I gained 25 lbs, then lost 40 in the last few years. I may have snoopy deformity. How can this best be corrected? FYI- I'm interested getting in much bigger implants. Photos are from after most recent BA + today.

Doctor Answers 12

Am I dealing with snoopy deformity? What's the best way to correct it?

Possibly.  It is difficult to say without examining you in person.  It certainly seems like your "today" photos show some droop of the breast tissue off of the implant.  Given you have a history of infection however, you could also have a component of capsular contracture.  Depending on whether one or both of these things is going on depends on how to treat it.  For droop of the breast tissue off the implant, typically a lift will be needed and/or lowering of the fold beneath the breast if it is too high.  If you have capsular contracture as well then a removal of the capsule is required & new pocket is sometimes needed for a new implant.  Although you may be able to go up slightly in size you want to be careful.  Choosing an implant that is too large for your body can make you look larger than you are, make the breast look unnaturally wide, and contributes to stretch on the breast skin.  Larger implants are also heavier so you may need to add some support internally (especially if there is capsular contracture) with an internal biologic mesh such as Strattice (pig-skin).  This is often done in cases of larger implants and/or capsular contracture as the Strattice functions as an internal bra and the recurrence rate (chance of coming back) of capsular contracture has been shown to be lower with its use. Please make sure that you are consulting with board certified plastic surgeons with experience performing such operations. Good luck!

Boca Raton Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Do I have snoopy deformity and can I have much larger implants?

Thank you so much for your question about your breast augmentation.

Photos can be misleading but the chief difference I see is smaller chest volume from your weight loss.
Yes, the implant is higher but this may be from loss of upper pole breast volume.
An exam is needed to tell if the breast is sitting below the implants. 
The photo suggests though that only more volume is needed.

Your implants seem to  extend to the side of your chest. 
If you like this - fine. Larger implants will make this even larger.

If you don't like this, discuss with your surgeon how to go bigger while minimizing the lateral fullness.

Be sure to see a Board Certified Plastic Surgeon.
Here’s hoping you find this helpful. Have a great day!

Bigger implants and / or a Breast lift

I don't think you have a snoopy deformity.  I think you either have a droopy breast that is hanging off the implant, or, you may have capsular contracture which has pushed the implant upwards.

If the breasts are soft, then it is likely droopiness.  There are a couple of options:

a)  You could go with a larger implant with more projection, and possibly move it into a submammary pocket (under the breast itself / over the muscle) to try to give the breast more lift, or,

b)  You could have a breast lift done, with or without putting in a slightly larger implant

Snoopy deformity

From your photos it looks like the encapsulated implants are riding high and your natural breast tissue is falling off of the capsule.Yes this can be corrected and putting in larger impalnts may help.But at the end of the day you have to be able to close the incision.

Robert Brueck, MD
Fort Myers Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 54 reviews

Analysis and Treatment of Postop Breast Deformity

Your later post op pictures show some relative fullness in the upper breast, slight flattening in the mid breast region, and slight sag of breast tissue below the nipple/areolar complex and the fold under the breast.  This may be due to scar capsule contracture, tightening of the scar capsule around the implant, which can make the breast a little more narrow and push the implant upward, relative to your regular breast tissue.  The history of a previous infection also fits with increased scar tissue tightening.  However, the size of your implants could also be a factor, stretching the breast skin in the lower region, resulting in the slight droop.  ;Surgery would probably consist of a capsulotomy or capsulection, release of the tight scar tissue or removal of it, and placement of implants back in a recreated pocket.  If there was still some looseness below the nipples in the lower breast region, then a minimal lift could be considered by removing a doughnut shaped skin segment around the areola.  Alternatively, placement of a larger implant might be able to take up the extra skin, therebye enlarging the breast and lifting the nipples and lower breast tissue upward.  These are just my thoughts based on your photos.  You should seek out a board certified plastic surgeon with a lot of experience in revising previous breast augmentations.

Richard G. Schwartz, MD
West Palm Beach Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Am I dealing with snoopy deformity? What's the best way to correct it?

Hi and thanks for your question.  IMHO you do not have a snoopy deformity. The snoopy deformity usually refers to breasts that are tuberous or tubular or many variations thereof. It appears as though you may have a capsule contracture. I feel you need to have contour correction of the pocket. A capsulectomy with abreast implant exchange. Following your staph infection the pocket was affected and therefore changed its contour. This infection caused an inflammatory reaction and subsequent capsule contracture. 

I am certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery and have practiced in the"land of breast implants", Miami, for the past 29 years. I encourage you to look up the surgeon you eventually select and make sure they have years of experience in performing cosmetic breast surgery. Furthermore request to see before and after photos of previous patients by that doctor....not a clinic or surgery center. Do your homework......research and verify the doctor's credentials. Have they had problems with the Board of Medicine, disciplinary or otherwise. Any law suits?

How about the center, clinic or facility? Are they accredited by a national organization or do they just have State approval. Understand that at the current time, there are three nationally recognized organizations responsible for the highest levels of patient safety, AAAASF, AAACH and JCHO. You owe it to yourself to position yourself for the best possible results but under the most stringent safety regulations, If you have kids, even more so.

How about anesthesia? Will you have a medical doctor certified by the American Board of Anesthsiology or a certified nurse anesthetist (CRNA)? Understand that there is no substitute for research. Cosmetic surgery, no matter how simple it may be to the patients, are invasive procedures and as such carry certain risks and complications.

I wish you the best on your journey. I hope that the info provided has been helpful. Should you require any further clarification, do not hesitate to contact our institute. I answer all questions personally, not through patient coordinators or other marketing individuals.

In our office we use TouchMD which is a web based program in which patients have the ability to load their picture unto the program. I then evaluate them and can actually draw on the picture to show a potential patient where the incisions would be located and how the procedure is to be realized. It's all done to comply with HIPPA which is the federal law that protects the patient's medical information. Look them up. Good luck Dr PG

Changes in the appearance of breast implants

Your immediate post op photos demonstrate a good result.  However, the more recent photos do show a degree of snoopy deformity in which the breast tissue is falling off of the implant.  The implant appears high and this may be related to capsular contracture which is hardening and thickening of the scar tissue around the implant.  This may be a result of your history of implant infection or due to the large size of the implants.  At this point, you should have a consult with a board certified plastic surgeon who does a lot of complex breast revision cases.  You may need just a breast implant exchange with capsulectomy (removal of the thickened capsule) and/or breast lift.  A consult and exam would be the most important next step.

Kent V. Hasen, MD
Naples Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 56 reviews

Capsular contracture?

You may have capsular contracture if you feel like your implants feel harder than they used to and if the implants seem to have moved up higher.  If you feel like your implants are soft and they did not move upward, and you think your breast just seem to be hanging off your implants, then the issue is that your breast mass which sits on top of the implants (implants are under/deep to your breast tissue, not inside it) is falling off and needs a lift.

Martin Jugenburg, MD
Toronto Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 414 reviews

Am I dealing with snoopy deformity? What's the best way to correct it?

I see no "snoopy dog" deformity. But the breast tissue falling off the implant is what I see. I recommend a full lift to correct. But IN PERSON opinions are better to determine exactly what is needed... 

Am I dealing with snoopy deformity? What's the best way to correct it?

Based on your photos, I do not see a snoopy deformity.  Photos show a lot of breast volume. An in person exam is needed, but I do not think you are a candidate for larger implants.  Discuss this with your Plastic Surgeon.  Best wishes!

Robert E. Zaworski, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 55 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.