Exercising After Liposuction and Breast Augmentation?

It's been about 4 weeks since I had abdominal Liposuction and Breast augmentation. I want to know if it is okay to begin abdominal exercises. I also do alot of indoor cycling; Is this cardio exercise too extreme to begin after having Lipo and Breast augmentation?

Doctor Answers 10

Please ask your doctor

Your doctor will know exactly what they want you to do in terms or returning to exercise and what kinds of exercise to do and what to avoid.  We'd hate to tell you something that contradicted their advice and hurt your result. 

Easy Exercises after Breast Augmentation

Consult with your surgeon about the types of activities that are acceptable post-surgery. It is important that you not engage in strenuous activities in the first three (2-3) weeks after surgery. My own personal recommendations to my patients are start walking as much as you want to, as soon as you want to. Then progress as desired to high-reps, low-resistance exercises. Slowly progress for 6 weeks, after which time there are no restrictions. I advise my patients to refrain from strenuous physical activity such as heavy lifting with your arms or jogging for 6 weeks. Aerobic exercise will raise your blood pressure, which could cause late bleeding and harm your result. Once you begin exercising again, start gently and let your body tell you what it can tolerate. Don’t rush!! It is important that you follow your doctor's instructions so that you get the best aesthetic results.
#breastrevision #breastimplants

Larry S. Nichter, MD, MS, FACS
Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 99 reviews

Running after breast augmentation and lipo

Thank you for your question. You definitely want to follow your own surgeon's post-op activity instructions. This is a general guide I give to my patients:
1) No heavy lifting or strenuous activity for 6 weeks.
2) Resume walking at a leisurely pace right after surgery (e.g. 2 mph)
3) At 2 weeks, you can walk 2 miles at 2mph
4) At 3 weeks, you can walk 3 miles at 3mph
5) At 4 weeks, you can walk 4 miles at 4mph
6) At 5 weeks, you can jog 5 miles at 5mph
7) At 6 weeks, you can resume all activities, but listen to your body and use discomfort or tightness as a guide so you don't over do it.

May be okay but you should ask your surgeon

You should be okay to do abdominal exercises at this time, but you may need to wait another couple of weeks before you start spinning. However, you should ask your surgeon for their advice.



Exercising After Liposuction and Breast Augmentation?

Timing to return to specific types of exercise will vary from one patient to another. Best to check with your plastic surgeon for specific advice. Generally, I suggest patients gradually ease back into the strenuous aerobic exercise 4 to 6 weeks postoperatively, assuming that they are doing well and there have been no complications. Lower body exercise can generally be resumed 2 weeks postoperatively.  Use common sense, listen to your body, and gradually resume previous activity. In my practice, I ask patients to avoid contact and strenuous exercise involving the  pectoralis major muscles ( such as push-ups, bench press,   burpees,  dancing on a pole…) for at least 3-6 months.  Best wishes.

Safe to exercise four weeks after Lipo and Breast Implants

Your plastic surgeon should be giving you his personal recovery schedule and checking that you are ready to exercise.

I have found that liposuction patients have very little down time. All of my liposuction patients begin walking one mile a day the very first day after surgery, There is really nothing that you can do to harm yourself after lipo.

On the other hand, breast implant patients must be more careful after surgery. Full lower body exercise at 10 - 14 days and full upper body exercise at 4 weeks. The main concern is to avoid arm and chest motion that could cause bleeding. Most cases of bleeding ( hematoma) occur in the first 24 -72 hours after surgery. In only 2 patients out of thousands and thirty years of experience have I seen bleeding after 10 days. Both were the result of too much arm or chest movement.

Richard L. Dolsky, MD
Philadelphia Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

GO FOR IT.

GENERALLY, I ALLOW MY PATIENTS WHO HAVE UNDERGONE BREAST AUGMENTATION OR ABDOMINAL LIPOSUCTION TO RESUME PHYSICAL EXERCISE AFTER 2 WEEKS. I RECOMMEND STARTING SLOWLY AND GRADUALLY INCREASE THEIR ACTIVITY LEVEL. IF YOU ARE EXPERIENCING ANY DISCOMFORT I WOULD BACK OFF. AFTER BREAST AUGMENTATION YOU SHOULD WEAR A GOOD SUPPORTIVE SPORTS BRA DURING AEROBIC EXERCISES SUCH AS RUNNING, SPINNING OR USING AN ELLIPTICAL MACHINE.

Todd B. Koch, MD
Buffalo Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 27 reviews

You can probably go ahead

The best person to ask is your plastic surgeon as he/she is the one who performed the surgery and is the most appropriate person to ask this question. Generally speaking, most patients can resume physical activity at 3 weeks following abdominal liposuction or breast augmentation. I usually tell my patients to start slowly and if something doesn't feel right to stop.

Elan B. Singer, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 21 reviews

Beware of bouncing movements after your procedures

While I agree you should check with your doctor, I would caution you to avoid too much bouncing at four weeks. Abdominal work shouldn't involve this but, bike riding can if you are up and down quite a bit. I would defer this to 6 or even 8 weeks postop.

 

Robert Frank, MD
Munster Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

Exercise

Different plastic surgeons will have differing post-operative protocols and you should absolutely follow-up with your surgeon to find out what his/her recommendations are.  At four weeks I generally let patients begin to resume their normal activities.

Edmond A. Zingaro, MD
San Francisco Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.