Puffy nipples now permanently erect following gyno surgery (still, after 7 years). Any suggestions? (photos)

My nipples were puffy before gyno surgery and now they are flat with a prominent permanently hard tip. They have been this way for the entire 7 years post surgery. The tip is fairly large and unsightly. I believe it is scar tissue filling the tip, but i suppose it could be residual gland. Is there anyway to soften the tip and allow that tissue to spread to the flat part so that the tip is less prominent? Will steroid injections make my nipple look more natural with a gradual incline to tip?

Doctor Answers 1

Post-Op Scarring

Postoperative scarring within the breast tissue may cause areas of hardness. Occasionally, areas of hardness, when discovered later may cause worries about cancer. Mammography or even biopsy is occasionally indicated.

Following surgery, your incisions will go through a maturation process. For the first few months they will be red and possibly raised and/or firm. As the scar matures, after 6-12 months, it becomes soft, pale, flat, and much less noticeable. You may experience numbness, tingling, burning, “crawling”, or other peculiar sensations around the surgical area. This is a result of the healing of tiny fibers which are trapped in the incision site. These symptoms will disappear. Some people are prone to keloids, which is an abnormal scar that becomes prominent. If you or a blood relative has a tendency to keloid formation, please inform the doctor.

With this amount of time since your surgery it is likely that this is the final healed appearance from your original procedure. There is always the option to re-visit your previous surgeon to have the area evaluated for the potential of revision. OR... you can seek out another local board certified plastic surgeon for a consultation on the available revision options to help minimize this scar. Good luck!

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