Impacted wisdom tooth upper right... Causing fat Jowl and upper lid and lash ptosis?

I had my left upper wisdom tooth extracted last fall and the left side of my face looks fine while the other side is fat and my hooded eye is more hooded on the right and my lash is drooping also on the right. I'm hoping when I get this other one out the problems get solved. Could my impacted tooth be the cause of this? I'm 29 I started getting really insecure about my face a few years ago and I'm wondering if it's the wisdom teeth nobody told me needed to come out until last year.

Doctor Answers 4

Facial asymmetry.

Everyones face has some degree of asymmetry which is normal.  The fullness on one side of your face and the hooded eyelid and lash droop are not due to the wisdom teeth being in or removed.  A board certified plastic surgeon could give you options on how to improve on this, if that is what you would like.

Wisdom Tooth and External Face

An impacted maxillary third molar (wisdom tooth) is not the cause of any external facial issues as it is completely within the bone. Thus its removal will not improve jowls or a hooded eyelid. These facial procedures must be treated more directly.

You probably need eyelid surgery.

Swelling can cause a permanent change in an eyelid.  I think you have waited long enough for this to resolve.  It is reasonable to consult fellowship trained oculoplastic surgeons to learn your options for addressing this issue.  The ptosis, lash ptosis, and hooding can be corrected with one surgery.

Kenneth D. Steinsapir, MD
Los Angeles Oculoplastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

Swelling after oral surgery unrelated to eyelid hooding

Swelling may accompany oral surgery and travel down to the jowl area temporarily. However, there is no relationship between wisdom teeth and hooding of the eyelids.

Sara A. Kaltreider, MD
Charlottesville Oculoplastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 3 reviews

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