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Can I Get my Old Nose Back?

I had rhinoplasty to fix a deviated septum, but the doctor also raised my tip. This was never discussed and now I don't look like my self anymore. I am now very upset and depressed. Is it possible to undo the tip raising and bring it back to its original position?

Doctor Answers (13)

Revision Surgery

+2

It sounds like you have had an unfortunate result from yor rhinoplasty.  Some alterations to the tip of the nose that are performed during rhinoplasty are absolutely reversible.  These include removing tip shaping sutures and removing any cartilage grafts that were placed.  Some tip changes such as cartilage removal however are not fixable as once the cartilage is gone, it is gone.  Good luck with the revision surgery.


Dallas Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 20 reviews

Lowering the Tip or Reducing Projection in Revision Rhinoplasty

+1

    The tip can be lowered or derotated if it is pointing too high up.  In some people, the tip is too projected.  It is important to distinguish the two from a patient's perspective.  Both can be corrected.

Kenneth B. Hughes, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 203 reviews

Undoing a change in the nose

+1

It is possible to reverse a change in the shape of your nose.  However, it is very difficult.  You need an extremely experienced surgeon in revision rhinoplasty.

Talmage Raine MD FACS

drraine.com

Talmage J. Raine, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

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Revision rhinoplasty

+1

Photos or an exam would really be necessary to provide you with specific advice. In the hands of an experienced revision rhinoplasty specialist, improvements can likely be made, as it is possible to lower the tip during surgery. I would recommend waiting at least one year before considering any revision procedures. I hope this helps, and I wish you the best of luck. 

Paul S. Nassif, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 32 reviews

It's hard to go back

+1

It may be possible to try to return your tip to its pre surgery position, but  this cannot be guaranteed.  The nose will heal and affect the final result. If the nose is in a position that is in need of correction, a revision may be indicated.

Robert Mounsey, MD
Toronto Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Getting one's old nose back

+1

It is a difficult question to answer without seeing your pre-op photos and seeing you now.  Some corrections could be made eventually once the swelling has gone down.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Getting your old nose back after rhinoplasty

+1
Having a clear plan before rhinoplasty is very important to avoid unpleasant surprises. You can get much of your 'old' nose back, though you will have to wait until the tissues soften, about a year for most. Both you and your surgeon should complete a careful review of photos and the goals, so you both are going the same direction.

Peter E. Johnson, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 28 reviews

Revision Rhinoplasty

+1

There are multiple reasons why the tip may be over-rotated. Photos would be helpful to further asses. If the over-rotation is from post surgical swelling then I would wait, if its related to a surgical maneuver I would proceed around 6 months.

Michel Siegel, MD
Houston Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 78 reviews

Relax and heal

+1

You need to give your nose a year after the surgery to fully heal before contemplating any revisional surgery. Your nose will naturally drop and soften. You  will probably never quite get your original nose back.

William B. Rosenblatt, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

I Want My Old Nose

+1

Your nose can be lengthened if that is what you need and want. Pictures are necessary for me to be more specific.

Richard W. Fleming, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.