Does Thick Scar Tissue on Neck After Platysmaplasty and Submental Lipectomy Go Away on It's Own?

I am 2.5 weeks post-op on a platysmaplasty with submental lipectomy. The first 1.5 weeks everything looked great! At that point, very thick, unsightly scar tissue began to form on my neck right under my chin. It has gotten worse this past week, with puckering and raised indented areas. I have been told this kind of tissue can go away completely on its own. Can it? And what timeline am I looking at, in general? A month? Two years? I feel deformed and severely depressed because of these results.

Doctor Answers 3

Scar tissue after neck lift.

photos would b helpful, as it is not clear to me if the area in question is under the skin, or on the skin.
2.5 weeks after surgery is still early on the healing process, puckering and raised areas on the skin incision usually improve within two to six months.

Scar tissue after neck lift.

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photos would b helpful, as it is not clear to me if the area in question is under the skin, or on the skin.
2.5 weeks after surgery is still early on the healing process, puckering and raised areas on the skin incision usually improve within two to six months.

Managing Scar Tissue After Platysmaplasty and Submental Lipectomy

It is still very early into your healing. Your incisions will go through many changes before seeing the final result of your procedure. Thus, you must be patient. The #scars from a #neck lift mature within six to twelve months from the surgery date. It is during this time that the rejuvenating effects of the procedure will become apparent and the real result will be seen. We find that scar reducing product, BioCorneum , appears to be very effective. But, you should have your doctor's permission to use such beforehand. 
If you have certain concerns about the procedures and #healing process, it is recommended to call your board-certified surgeon or their medical staff and discuss those #concerns.

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Managing Scar Tissue After Platysmaplasty and Submental Lipectomy

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It is still very early into your healing. Your incisions will go through many changes before seeing the final result of your procedure. Thus, you must be patient. The #scars from a #neck lift mature within six to twelve months from the surgery date. It is during this time that the rejuvenating effects of the procedure will become apparent and the real result will be seen. We find that scar reducing product, BioCorneum , appears to be very effective. But, you should have your doctor's permission to use such beforehand. 
If you have certain concerns about the procedures and #healing process, it is recommended to call your board-certified surgeon or their medical staff and discuss those #concerns.

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Neck after Corset Platysmaplasty

If you have "thickness" of tissues right under the chin at 2.5 weeks after the Platysmaplasty, it probably represents collection of blood that occured after surgery that has now become  an "organized" hematoma and will resolve with time but can take weeks to months.  You can massage it and you should also return to your surgeon to have it evaluated. Sometimes these areas can be carefully injected with a steroid to resolve them Faster.

Neck after Corset Platysmaplasty

{{ voteCount >= 0 ? '+' + (voteCount + 1) : (voteCount + 1) }}

If you have "thickness" of tissues right under the chin at 2.5 weeks after the Platysmaplasty, it probably represents collection of blood that occured after surgery that has now become  an "organized" hematoma and will resolve with time but can take weeks to months.  You can massage it and you should also return to your surgeon to have it evaluated. Sometimes these areas can be carefully injected with a steroid to resolve them Faster.

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.