Can twilight sedation be used in place of local anesthesia during chin lipo? (Photo)

I have a chronic anxiety disorder I already take oral medicine (Xanax) daily 4 times a day. 05MG each dose. I want to know if twilight sedation is an option and by how much does it increase the price? How long is the procedure.

Doctor Answers 7

Anesthesia for chin surgery or liposuction

I prefer to use intravenous sedation  for all of my chin surgery or liposuction cases, and rarely attempt these procedures under local aneshesia alone. With the rapid recovery and safelty of the drugs that are used today, there is no need to feel any discomfort or be awake for any procedure. Most patients prefer intravenous anesthesia and we perfom this service in our accredited surgery facility without the need for an anesthesiologist. The procedure takes from 30 to 45 minutes.

Chin Liposuction With Sedation

Personally, I prefer to do these cases with patients awake because they can help me by moving their head in different directions so that I can get a complete result.  I have done it with patients sedated a couple of times, but found it very challenging to do things the way I want despite having help from nurses and other staff to hold the neck in various positions.

I would encourage you to take some Xanax and do this awake, but perhaps one of your local surgeons has had a better experience with sedation.

Good Luck!

Thomas P. Sterry, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

Can twilight sedation be used in place of local anesthesia during chin liposuction?

Chin  liposuction can be  performed under local anesthesia or twilight sedation, it just depends upon the patient's desires. When sedation is used, there is usually an additional fee for the anesthesiologist. Chin liposuction usually takes approximately 30 minutes, however it's performed in an outpatient surgery center. For more information, many examples, and our current price list, please see the link and the video below

William Portuese, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 129 reviews

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Lipo with sedation

The answer is 100 percent eventhough local in form of tumescent is necessary.  Sedation with twilight is very easy to do in our practice.  

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Chin lipo anesthesia

Thanks for asking.  Chin lipo can be performed under local anesthesia with oral sedation (valium) or twilight anesthesia.  Twilight will be a good choice given your anxiety.  Consult with several experienced board certified surgeons to discuss your procedure, results, recovery, and costs.  Procedure takes on average 40 minutes but depends on complexity.  Best of luck rm77.


Raymond E. Lee, MD
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Treating the double chin

Removing the submental fat pad can make a dramatic improvement in the appearance of one's face.  It can be done with liposuction and certainly this can be done under straight local anesthetic or twilight.  That's a discussion best had with your surgeon.  Another new option is treating this area with an injection, Kybella, as an office visit.  It generally takes 2-3 injection sessions, and that's done without any anesthetic at all.

Leo McCafferty, MD
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Anesthesia for chin liposuction

Liposuction under the chin can be done with a variety of types of anesthesia.  Some surgeons may elect to perform the surgery with just local anesthesia but it certainly can be done with IV sedation or even general anesthesia.  I normally perform the procedure with IV sedation (twilight anesthesia).  The procedure should not take more than 30 minutes or so. The cost of the procedure will vary by surgeon and by the facility used to perform the surgery.  

Michael I. Echavez, MD
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These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.