25 yrs old. Crows feet and droopy eyelids! Why is this happening and what can I do to fix and prevent? (photo)

My skin has deteriorated rapidly within the last 6 months. I don't know what is going on, and I'm kinda freaking out. My main areas that I am noticing are around eyes - underneath and at ends (crows feet extending up towards temple and down cheek) and dropping eyelids.

Doctor Answers 18

Botox

Thank you so much for reaching out and posting photos! I would suggest a modest dose of botox and you should be good to go! We would love to see you in our Mission Viejo or Newport Beach offices for a free consultation to go over options and answer any questions you may have. Best of Luck! Dr. K 


Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 21 reviews

Botox for crow's feet

Thank you for your question Runrun123. Botox is a purified protein used to address wrinkles associated with facial expression such as the crow's feet seen around the eyes when one smiles or squints. Botox is a great treatment for crow's feet and when this treatment is performed a gentle lifting of the brows is usually seen. The pivotal studies demonstrated that the maximum effect is seen 14 days after the treatment. Most people enjoy the results of their Botox treatment for 3-4 months. At that time a maintenance treatment is recommended. 

Please consult with a doctor for specific recommendations. Good luck!

Alex Eshaghian, MD, PhD
Encino Physician
5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review

Crows feet and droopy eyelids

It's not unusual for a 25 year old to come in to Quintessa with similar complaints. Most of those patients need an endoscopic browlift, but many can be treated non-surgically with Botox, filler, and even Ultherapy. I'd have to personally examine you in order to discuss your best options.

Andrew Campbell, M.D.

Facial Rejuvenation Specialist

Quintessa Aesthetic Centers

Andrew Campbell, MD
Milwaukee Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.7 out of 5 stars 26 reviews

Aging eyes

Thank you for the photos. You have both surgical and non-surgical options to improve your eyes.  A quick and simple solution would be to have hyaluronic acid fillers such as Restylane to your lower eyelid area to smooth and lighten the shadows and creases in the area. A small amount of Botox injected into the brow area will also give you a nice subtle brow lift and brighten your eyes as well. Botox injected around your crow's feet will also reduce their apperance when you squint or smile. For excess skin around the upper or lower eyelids surgery can be performed to remove and tighten the eyelids. Sometimes "dropping" eyelids can be due to more than just extra skin. A low brow or stretched eyelid muscles can also affect your eyes and both of these would require surgery to correct as well. For the best treatment options, it is important to have an in-person examination to determine what is exactly causing your appearance to provide the correct treatment. Hope this helps!

Johnson C. Lee MD, Plastic Surgery

Johnson C. Lee, MD
Beverly Hills Physician
5.0 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Crow's Feet and Droopy Eyelids in 25 Year Old Lady

Botox is the best treatment for the crow's feet. With only limited views of your eyes I cannot comment on your "droopy eyelids".

Richard W. Fleming, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 38 reviews

Crows feet correction

Thank you for your question and for attaching photos. You should see a board certified plastic surgeon in your area who has a great med-spa and experienced injector. Botox for the crows feet would certainly help. You should also get set up on a good skincare program with an antioxidant, Retin A and a physical sun block to prevent and reduce fine lines and wrinkles due to sun damage. Best of luck.

Crows feet

Thank your for your question. Botox does great to help reduce and prevent further crows feet. There area also alot of options to help with the fine lines, texture and pigment changes that come with aging and sun exposure. These include laser, microneedling, peels as well as topical creams to get you started on. I would recommend you make an appointment with a dermatologist for a consult to go over your options and get you started on a treatment plan that best suits you and your needs. 

Lenore Sikorski, MD
Orange County Dermatologist
4.3 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Solutions for 25 Year Old with Crows Feet & Droopy Eyelid

Dear Runrun123:

Thank you for your question and photos.  With age and sun exposure comes crows feet and skin laxity.  Fortunately we are in an era where there are a variety of treatment solutions that can help you looking and staying young.  Treatment options include Botox for crows feet, dermal fillers, chemical peels and lasers for lifting and texturing of the skin.  Please ensure you use sun protection as well as maintenance topical retinols.  All the best and please be reassured that there is no need to freak out.

Crow's Feet Conundrum--Botox, creams, lasers, microneedling/prp

These lines are from genetics, aging, and movement.  All can be improved with topical creams, lasers, microneedling/prp, and botox/dysport. See an expert for a formal evaluation. Best, Dr. Emer.

Jason Emer, MD
Los Angeles Dermatologic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 165 reviews

Crows feet and droopy eye at 26

We get our looks from our parents, so genetics is playing a part in this.  Don't worry.  If things start to bother you, and I say, in my practice it starts at an early age now, you can consider botox, little operations such as eye lid or mini temporal lift , or just botox.  My two kids are now ages 24 and 30.  My son at age 16, could've used botox, as he has a very animated face.  My daughter who is now 30, will occasionally ask for some.  It all depends.  

Good luck to you!

Dr. Kimberly Henry


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Kimberly A. Henry, MD
Greenbrae Plastic Surgeon
4.7 out of 5 stars 36 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.