Once glandular tissue forms behind the male nipple, can it go away without surgery?

Doctor Answers 12

Glandular tissue

Sometimes gynecomastia can subside on its own.  A good example is in teenagers where by puberty many of the cases resolve spontaneously.  It is more rare for adults to have a spontaneous resolution but it is possible, particularly if it is medication induced.

Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 30 reviews

Glandular tissue behind the breast

Glandular tissue will not be dramatically affected by weight gain/loss; the surrounding fat content in the breast will be more affected. A consultation would be helpful to discuss further details.

Arian Mowlavi, MD
Orange County Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 41 reviews


Excess glandular breast tissue in males, regardless of age is called gynecomastia. In usually first appears during puberty. if it does not go away within two years it will usually remain for life. Surgery is really the only treatment.

Breast gland treatment without the knife

You can try taking medication like Tamoxifen or Arimidex and see if it helps make your breast tissue go away.  Some patients have also had some success with CoolSculpt treatments to the chest


David S. Rosenberg, MD
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

Once glandular tissue forms behind the male nipple, can it go away without surgery?

Yes, breast glandular tissue "can go away" without surgical intervention;  this is most commonly seen in pubertal gynecomastia. Once gynecomastia has been present for longer than a year, it is unlikely to spontaneously resolve.   In most cases, gynecomastia is treated with resection of the excess breast tissue; peripheral chest liposuction surgery may also be helpful.
I hope this, and the attached link dedicated to gynecomastia surgery concerns, helps. Best wishes.

Male Glandular Breast Tissue

Glandular tissue in men is not going to go away without some form of surgery unless one is an early teenager. 

#Breastreduction #gynecomastia


Most likely it does not go a way. If you waited at least 6 months and its still present and bothers you, a simple excision may be all it takes.  I would consult with a plastic surgeon.

Please don’t hesitate to reach out if you have any more questions.
I hope this was helpful,
Dr. Daniel Barrett
Plastic Surgery
Beverly Hills, CA

Daniel Barrett, MD
Beverly Hills Physician
5.0 out of 5 stars 36 reviews


If you suffer from real gynecomastia the only solution is surgical.
How should I choose a surgeon?
Choose carefully. The decision is yours. Advice to assist in making your selection.Only a board certified plastic surgeon
1. Experience matters. Choosing a surgeon increases the likelihood that they have seen a case similar to yours in the past. Selecting a surgeon whose practice is focused on gynecomastia exclusively is also an indicator of experience.
2. Results matter. The more before-and-after pictures, the better. Pay attention whether the surgeon is confident enough to show multiple angles of the same patient.
3.Only gynecomastia Reviews matter.
4. Expertise matters. Is your surgeon recognized by the profession as an authority in the field? Have they authored books or medical journal articles regarding your surgery?
Be realistic about your expectations. Also, revision surgery tends to be significantly more difficult than initial surgery.

Mordcai Blau, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.6 out of 5 stars 52 reviews

Glandular tissue

The answer to that question is both yes and no but if it has been present for over a year and you are beyond puberty and have no underlying endocrine problems more then likely surgery will be required

Dr Corbin

Frederic H. Corbin, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 58 reviews

Glandular Tissue

In most cases the glandular tissue can only be removed with surgery.  Consult with a Board Certified Plastic Surgeon for an evaluation.

Robert E. Zaworski, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 55 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.