Botox in procerus?

If I get Botox in my procerus only, can I expect a subtle lifting effect? As I age, boyox in the corrugated drops my brow and gives me a "hard" look. Thanks!

Doctor Answers 12


Injection of Botox in the medial brow and upper nose region (where procerus muscle is located) can help with wrinkles of the region and a modest lifting effect if the frontalis muscle is left unopposed. The key point is to distinguish the aesthetic implications of medial brow lift (in this case) versus lateral brow lift.

Los Angeles Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 2 reviews

Botox in Procerus.

Yes, the procerus pulls down and typically gives the horizontal crease right above the bridge of the nose.  Relaxing it will give a subtle lifting effect.

Lawrence Broder, MD
Cedar Park Family Physician
4.8 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

Botox in the procerus?

Botox injected into the Procerus, Corrigator supercilii, and the lateral portion of the Obicularis oculi muscles can result in a very pleasing brow lift effect.  In general, if the corrigators are properly injected, it should result in a lifting of the medial brow, not lowering.  Best wishes, Dr. Lepore.

Vincent D. Lepore, MD
San Jose Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 50 reviews

Forehead lift with Botox

Dear Clare3343:

Yes, if diagnosed properly as the procerus muscle of the mid upper nose, Botox may release some of the downward pull on the mid lower forehead between the brows. 

Generally, it is a properly injected corregator and upper lateral orbicularis muscles which will allow the frontalis muscle to lift the forehead.

Find a well skilled, Board Certified Plastic Surgeon who understands the anatomy and dynamics of facial muscles to perform your injections. All the best!

Dean P. Kane, MD, FACS
Baltimore Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 69 reviews

Botox for a brow lift effect

We generally recommend 20-30 units of botox to the 'glabellar' muscle and another 10 units for crow's feet on each side - this combination tends to raise brow position when the frontalis muscle is left untreated. Treatments should last 3-4 months at this dosing.

Botox/Procerus/Lift Brow/Avoid "Hard" Look--Lasers, Peels, Fillers, Skin Care, Fat Injections/Sculptra, RF skin tightening

Injecting Botox in the procerus will give a subtle lift. You can also achieve a lift with non-invasive procedures like lasers or RF, sculptra/PRP, microneedling and quality skin care. See a facial sculpting expert. Best, Dr. Emer

Jason Emer, MD
Los Angeles Dermatologic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 159 reviews

Procures injection

While the procerus attaches to the skin between the brows, its function is more as an elevator of some of the skin of the nose, helping flare the nostrils, than pull down on the brow.  Botox is effective at relaxing the muscle and softening transverse creases across the nasal bridge, but as the muscle is so thin, its pull on the brow is limited, and minimal, if any brow elevation is appreciable.  Thanks for the question.  

Larry Lickstein, MD
Fairfax Plastic Surgeon
4.3 out of 5 stars 38 reviews

Medial brow ptosis from Botox

This can happen and the injector might not have the knowledge to help prevent this. In these cases, the depressor supercilii needs injection too. Some of the Botox diffuses into the lower frontalis muscle and is causing this "mean look". Injecting just the procerus will produce a minor/minimal lift.

Steven F. Weiner, MD
Panama City Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.6 out of 5 stars 26 reviews

Botox in procerus

If your brow is dropping after Botox in the corrugators, it means the Botox is either migrating or was inadvertently placed in the frontalis muscle which is the muscle that raises our eyebrows. 

Byron A. Long, MD
Marietta Oculoplastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 3 reviews

Procerus botox

procerus botox will treat the horizontal frown lines between the brow. Injecting this muscle does not drop the brow or change its position in any way. I recommend you have your concerns evaluated by an experienced injector to devise a treatment plan that addresses your concerns. 

Essie K. Yates, MD
Fort Lauderdale Physician
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.