Green yellow pus from wound? Normal? (photos)

I had a mastopexy and augmentation 6 weeks ago today. Changed the dressing as normal and found green/yellow pus coming out from the insision. Is this normal? I have put on an inodine dressing but I'm not sure if this is an infection or if it's normal healing? Thanks for any replies

Doctor Answers 9

A draining wound with surrounding erythema six weeks after breast surgery should be reported to your surgeon.

It looks as though you have a small stitch abscess but the erythema surrounding it is a bit worrisome. Definitely show this to your surgeon.


Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 32 reviews

Wound Healing

Redness, swelling, heat, and pain are all signs of infection. While you only report one of these, infections are a big deal and should be addressed immediately when present. Best is to discuss specifically with the operating surgeon so that he /she can take a look.

Pus from wound following breast surgery

 Whilst it is never normal for pus to be coming out of a wound, it does look like a fairly superficial problem from the photos you provided. 

James Murphy, FRCS(Plast)
Manchester Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 89 reviews

Wound drainage

If you have any new wound drainage, regardless of the colour, I would recommend contacting your plastic surgeon for a proper assessment.

Pus draining from incision 6 weeks after lift + augmentation

Thank you for your question about your breast lift and breast augmentation.
  • Fortunately your photo suggests that the 'pus' is actually dissolving sutures.
  • Many internal sutures are designed to dissolve in 6 weeks.
  • You do need to be checked by your surgeon - s/he may be able to remove the sutures and may want to treat you with antibiotics -
  • And s/he will make sure that nothing more serious is developing.


Always consult a Board Certified Plastic Surgeon.
Hope you find this information helpful. Best wishes.

Yellow discharge

Often as dissolvable stitches dissolve you can get discharge such as this. Small stitch abscesses once released discharge and usually heal. If the area continues to discharge or you have pain or redness then you need to see your PS and may need antibiotic cover. I would let your PS know regardless but it does not look infected currently.

Gary L. Ross, MBChB, FRCS
Manchester Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 142 reviews

Green yellow pus from wound? Normal?

Dear Minnie, this may be a stitch that hasn't fully dissolved but it could also be a early infection.  Let your surgeon know about this and make an appointment to see him/her as soon as possible.  In the meantime, an iodine or polysporin ointment dressing should help.  Best wishes, Dr Lepore. 

Vincent D. Lepore, MD
San Jose Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 50 reviews

Spitting sutures can occur after surgery

I have added a link that might be helpful...

Hi minnie85, your right to be concerned and your iodine application is reasonable. The opening looks pretty low down and your implant may be covered only with skin,fat and breast tissue there, even if they were placed "below the muscle" (since some muscle fibers have to be released to get the implant in). Generally speaking, when sutures are getting absorbed, there is some yellowish drainage that is generated-if the suture is getting pushed to the surface, the drainage lands on the dressing. You should be examined by your plastic surgeon, especially if you have a fever or if the redness spreads. Best wishes, Dr Doolabh, Jacksonville Plastic Surgeon

Drainage after mastopexy with implants

Minnie, you are probably trying to extrude a suture in this area, but depending on the position of the implant (above versus under the muscle), you need to be sure that this is not an area of communication from the skin to the location of the implant.  Your surgeon needs to assess that issue sooner, rather than later. I hope that this helps. General information concerning mastopexy with implants if found below.

Thomas M. DeWire Sr., MD (retired)
Richmond Plastic Surgeon
4.3 out of 5 stars 35 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.