Does having a tooth infection automatically means you will get capsular contracture?

If you get a tooth infection after breast augmentation does this mean that you will get capsular contracture?

Doctor Answers 9

Dental infection and capsular contracture.

The short answer is no - a tooth infection does NOT mean you will get a capsular contracture. However, if you have an ongoing tooth infection or are having necessary dental work, I would not recommend having breast implants placed until the infection is cleared. The concern with dental procedures has to do with a chance of having bacteria in the bloodstream for a short period of time. If you have recently had breast implants (within 3 months), the implant capsule is forming and is very vascular. The concern is that bacteria in the bloodstream could seed the capsule and lead to a contracture or implant infection. This is one reason why elective implant procedures are contraindicated if you have an ongoing infection somewhere in your body (UTI, sinus infection, etc.).


Boca Raton Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 19 reviews

Tooth infection and capsular contracture

There is not evidence in the literature that I know of that suggests a tooth infection will cause a capsular contracture.  Treat the tooth infection as recommended by your dentist.

Steven Wallach, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.1 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Breast augmentation question

No, having an infected tooth after your augmentation does not mean that you will automatically get a capsular contracture. Factors such as how long it has been since your surgery and whether or not the infection is localized or has entered your blood stream will make a difference. Discuss your concerns with your surgeon. 

Infection and capsular contracture

Even at the most recent annual meeting of the American Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons, there was heated debate about capsular contracture and biofilm formation, or a film of bacteria that may be associated with capsular contracture. Regardless, a tooth infection could cause bacteria to be in the blood and may be associated with an implant infection. It is hard to say and every surgeon has different recommendations about antibiotics with dental procedures. Check with your board certified plastic surgeon for their suggestions. Best of luck, MMT

Not automatic.

I agree with the comments of the first 2 surgeons. It's not automatic, but there may be an increased risk of CC with dental infections and procedures. Best wishes, Dr. Aldo

Aldo Guerra, MD
Scottsdale Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 190 reviews

Infection and capsule contracture

Dear Lilana
The short answer is no. However there have been studies suggesting linkage of infections at other part of body and breast contracture. Keep an eye for possible contracture and see your surgeon if you suspect it. 

Neil T. Chen, MD
Albuquerque Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 72 reviews

No

Capsular contracture is one of the dreaded complication after breast augmentation.  The main problem is that we have no idea how to prevent it.  The best we can do is to minimize the risks.  Most people who have a tooth infection will not get CC.
Best Wishes,
Nana Mizuguchi, MD

Nana N. Mizuguchi, MD, FACS
Louisville Plastic Surgeon
4.7 out of 5 stars 45 reviews

Does having a tooth infection automatically means you will get capsular contracture?

Hello dear, thanks for your question and provided information as well.. it is not a problem having a thooth infection while you want to have surgery, they're both separate things, get to your surgeon for more information, you will be alright, hugs!

Tania Medina de Garcia, MD
Dominican Republic Plastic Surgeon
4.6 out of 5 stars 358 reviews

Does having a tooth infection automatically means you will get capsular contracture?

Simple one word answer..No.  You will be fine.  Hope your tooth infection improves soon. Good luck.
Dr Vasisht
South Shore Plastic Surgery

Bhupesh Vasisht, MD
Voorhees Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 75 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.