2 weeks post tummy tuck fleur de lis, is this a good healing scar? (Photo)

I am 16 days post tummy tuck fleur de lis, and my doctor says my scar is healing well i get a bit paranoid, is this a good sign that my scar is healing well and what can i do about the black spots.

Doctor Answers 7

Excellent Result

Hi - for 2 weeks post op your result looks excellent.  I believe your surgeon has done a great job.  Continue to follow their advice regarding your care.  All the best

Melbourne Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 35 reviews

Abdominal scar healing

looks like your surgeon did a great job and you appear to be doing well. Use sunblock, wear a firm but not tight garment and massage your scar in its direction highly with a lubricant. All will help to mature your scar quickly and do keep your regular cisits.

Robert V. Mandraccia, MD
Fort Myers Plastic Surgeon
4.6 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

Good healing?

Thank you for your question. Sounds like you may need a little reassurance. The Fleur de lis procedure is a bit more involved than a standard tummy tuck. Your incisions look to be healing very nicely at two weks.  Follow your surgeons instructions diligently.  Scars can take up to a year or more to fully mature. So be patient. You look to have a very nice result!Best Wishes,

Dr. Morrissey

Scar healing after tummy tuck takes time

Thank you for posting your photograph.  Of course, your surgeon is the best source of information about the course of healing, I do not see anything in this photograph that would make me concerned about a wound healing problem.  There is some crusting along the incision lines, which is  certainly normal, and a little redness along the incisions, but limited to a short distance from the incision, which is also normal.Things to watch for would include redness spreading beyond the area of the incisions, and especially increased pain, which could indicate infection.Patients are often anxious about the course of healing, which is certainly understandable, and it can be hard to be patient, but there is nothing anyone can do to make it heal faster.  I recommend you speak with your surgeon whenever you have a concern, and remember that when you have surgery, it will take a while to completely heal.

James Nachbar, MD
Scottsdale Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 19 reviews

2 weeks post op, some advices:

Thank you very much for sharing your concerns with us.At this point (2 weeks post-po) the swelling is normal.
To reduce it, I recommend you perform daily lymphatic drainage massage therapy over the abdomen and wear a postoperative girdle from thigh to the breasts.
Kind regards,
Dr. Emmanuel Mallol Cotes.-

Emmanuel Mallol Cotes, MD
Dominican Republic Plastic Surgeon
4.7 out of 5 stars 149 reviews

Post TT scar concerns

Thank you for your question. You are healing good and wound healing well as expected. Scar maturation usually takes about 6-9 months. Please follow instructions from your PS

Post-Op Scar Healing

Well, I can tell you what I tell my patients and that is healing after the  #tummytuck will take time. I have my patients out of bed and walking the night of surgery and every hour while awake.  I allow my patients to return to work at one to two weeks with 14 days preferred.  No lifting or straining.  At three weeks increased level of activity and full, no restrictions, at 6 weeks.Swelling can persist for several months and will gradually improve and will look better at three months, six months, and even one year. Frequently the pubic area  can become very swollen and discolored during the first two weeks due to gravity as this is the lowest area for swelling to accumulate. I can tell you that you appear to have minimal swelling which looks good, just be sure to care for the incisions well. 

Jed H. Horowitz, MD, FACS
Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 94 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.