Can Embrace Scar Cream help me 6 months after my tummy tuck?

Doctor Answers 8

Too late for Embrace

For Embrace to work, it should be started within 1 month of surgery.  You are well past that - so I would not recommend Embrace for you.  Instead, depending on what is happening with your scar, you may be a candidate for IPL or laser, kenalog, or even surgical scar revision.  It is hard to tell you exactly which option without a photo.  All the best,


Orlando Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 80 reviews

What can I use to make my scars better?

To make scars better, I have used ScaRxtape which for the best results needs to be applied and worn over the surgical scar or traumatic wound for two to three months. It usually stays on for about a week at a time and then it needs to be replaced. You can try it still but probably none of the products will be as effective.

Edward J. Domanskis, MD
Newport Beach Plastic Surgeon
4.4 out of 5 stars 27 reviews

Scar management at 6 months

Scar creams and topicals only help over the first few months. At this time, you should consider IPL and/or steroid injections. A consultation or even photograph would help provide you definitive recommendations.

Arian Mowlavi, MD, FACS
Orange County Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 68 reviews

TT and Embrace Cream

Hello Kymberly,

In my experience, Embrace cream is best used after the sutures are removed. I suggest that you speak with your PS. There are many different creams to assist in healing and appearance.

For instance, the following topical treatments such as BioCorneum, Scar Guard , Scar Fade and Mederma. Redness can be improved with laser treatments and the scars can be kept narrow with products such as Embrace.On occasion, keloids or hypertrophic scars can develop and will need treatment including Kenalog, 5FU and laser. All of the best for you!

#EmbraceCream  #scarcare

Jed H. Horowitz, MD, FACS
Orange County Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 110 reviews

Scar cream

I have not been overly impressed with many scar creams in the past.  Best to talk to your surgeon regarding what he prefers.

Steven Wallach, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.1 out of 5 stars 29 reviews

Embrace Scar Cream

In the first few weeks after surgery, I recommend the use of Embrace Scar Therapy which is an adherent silicone sheeting pre-stretched when applied so as to offload tension on the scar.
Ask your plastic surgeon for specific advice, but in general I have my patients use scar treatments the day after sutures are removed.
There are many possible causes for scars that are enlarged or not healing well. Unsightly scars are most commonly due to genetics, underlying medical conditions, or improper scar/wound care.

I have attached a link to help with scar management. 

#scarmanagement
#tummytuck

Larry S. Nichter, MD, MS, FACS
Orange County Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 159 reviews

Embrace is for the early recovery period.

Hello Kymberly. Embrace scar therapy is a silicone sheet that must be applied soon after surgery for it to be effective. The sheet reduces the mechanical tension along the incision and changes the way the DNA is expressed at the wound, creating a better environment and a nicer scar. Six months after your tummy tuck Embrace will not work. If the scar is particularly bad, then consider scar revision and embrace. Best, Dr. ALDO

Aldo Guerra, MD
Scottsdale Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 202 reviews

Scar minimizing abdominoplasty

Hello, thank you for your question.  There are many strategies to minimize scar formation which can be employed by your surgeon both during the surgery and in the post operative time period. Closing the incision in tension-minimizing manner can drastically decrease scar formation. Additionally, silicone gel sheeting used during the post-operative time period leaves many patients with barely-visible scars.

Richard G. Reish, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 131 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.